Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Page 19 of 2,109« First...10...181920...304050...Last »
Dallas District Attorney Susan Hawk, who admits she has a history of mental illness and drug abuse, checked herself into an inpatient treatment facility. Now, she maintains she is back on the job and fully capable of performing it. Not everyone agrees.

You may have heard that the Department of Labor has been focusing some of its enforcement efforts on low-wage service industries, particularly restaurants and fast- food outlets. That’s true. But federal courts are also stepping in to ensure that low-wage employees get every penny they are entitled to. That’s what recently happened when the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a tip-pooling case that the employee who makes coffee in the back (the barista) should not be participating in the restaurant’s tip pool.

Next to a credit card with a hefty limit, a workplace computer may be this year’s most essential holiday shopping tool. After a slight downturn in work-based online shopping in 2014, more employees say they’re spending working hours hunting for deals and buying gifts this year, according to CareerBuilder’s annual Cyber Monday survey.
Employers are free to set neutral call-off policies that punish even FMLA-protected absences. Just make sure you enforce your rules fairly and consistently. Don’t punish some employees but not others.
A recent case found that a mere one-year age difference wasn’t generally enough to show age discrimination.
Here's your monthly quiz on HR news and trends.
This time of year, illnesses of employ­­ees or their loved ones, and bad weather, can lead to legitimate spikes in workplace absences. Maintain productivity by following this advice.
Sensitive workers may perceive everyday interactions as harassment. But courts don’t measure whether workplace hostility exists based on that employee’s subjective assessment of the situation. Instead, a court will focus on how a hypothetical “reasonable” employee would view it.

Employees who complain to HR or management about alleged discrimination or harassment are engaging in protected activity and can’t be punished for complaining. But what if the employee can’t summon the courage to complain and, instead, sends someone else? Is sending a spokesperson to complain also protected activity? A federal court says “yes,” at least when it’s the employee’s spouse who takes action.

Q. An employee brought to the attention of his supervisor that a co-worker had posted a comment on social media saying that her supervisor is Scrooge, that the supervisor is probably planning to fire a bunch of people right before the holidays, and that everyone should complain about her unfair behavior so that the supervisor is the one who will get fired. The company has a social media policy that prohibits making disparaging comments about it or its employees. Can the company discipline the posting co-worker for these comments?