Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Q. I constantly run into this problem: I pre-screen a candidate who seems like a perfect fit for the job description. But when I send the person to the hiring manager for an interview, I'm told to keep looking for someone better. This is frustrating to the managers, the applicants and me. Any suggestions on how I can improve my pre-screening? —P.B., New Jersey

Q. In recent months, a sharp decline in revenue has forced us to consider downsizing. What are the legal risks associated with a layoff and how can we minimize them? —L.C., Hawaii

Q. Our employment application asks whether the candidate has been convicted of a felony. Is it legal for us to ask this? If so, can we ask what the applicant has been convicted of and can that information be used as a basis for not hiring an individual? —C.H., Arizona

Florida employees who refuse to work because of health or safety reasons can still receive unemployment benefits  ...

Make sure your supervisors (and you) know how to respond when an employee requests leave for his or her own serious illness or a family member's illness. If you don't follow the FMLA's rules on how and when to request written proof about the illness or injury, you lose your right to challenge the employee's leave request ...

The federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), which regulates employee benefit plans, usually covers employees' claims related to their benefits. However, Texas employers who opt out of the state workers' compensation program may receive a nasty surprise ...

Gov. Rendell signed legislation last month that increases Pennsylvania's minimum wage by $2 per hour phased in over the next two years, but smaller businesses will have more time before having to pay the higher rates ...

Before making big changes to your benefit plans, calculate the cost savings against the possible cost of paying your share of unemployment compensation for employees who quit in protest over those benefit changes ...

Make sure you're complying with the state's new minimum wage, which increased $1 per hour on Oct. 1 to $7.15 per hour. (For full-time college students, you may pay as little as 85 percent of the minimum wage.) ...

If you use employment contracts to ensure that you have specially trained employees for a predictable time period, make sure the contract gives you "wiggle room" to terminate the employee ...