Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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In many states, vocational programs pair disabled residents with “job coaches,” who help them find appropriate work and adapt to those jobs. Since the ADA also requires employers to make reasonable accommodations during the hiring process, make sure job coaches are welcome in your interviews ...

There’s a right way and a wrong way to make sure employees have a “serious” condition that qualifies for FMLA leave ...

If your organization hires temporary workers to perform specific tasks for a set fee, don’t assume you automatically can declare them as independent contractors rather than employees ...

Three former managers from the Guilderland plant of crate manufacturer IFCO Systems, headquartered in Houston, pleaded guilty to conspiring to hire illegal workers ...

When a co-worker launches a harassment campaign, you must act fast or risk a hostile-environment lawsuit. That means all your managers must know the drill to follow the moment they get wind of harassment ...

Who would have thought dropping the name “Osama” could get you out of trouble in a U.S. courtroom? ...

Q. I have a question about the new highly compensated exemption. I have inside salespeople and their base salary is about $40,000, but their commissions net them over $130,000 a year. Could I classify them as exempt? —Michelle, California

Q. An ice storm recently knocked out power in 87 percent of the city. Our company had no power from Sunday until Wednesday. Some hourly employees showed up to work Monday because they live in surrounding counties and didn't know about the outage. Are we obligated to pay those who showed up but were unable to work? —D.K., Kentucky

Q. We offer all employees two weeks' paid vacation a year. If an employee chooses a 100-percent, full-commission pay structure, how should we set her pay for vacation? The employee wants to take her annual pay divided by 52 weeks, but we feel that's unfair to the employees who are on salary plus commission, because their vacation pay is based on their base salary divided by 52 weeks. Is there a correct and legal way to figure this? —R.D., Florida

Q. The animal care officers who work for us spend 80 percent of their time driving and responding to rescue calls via cell phone. Requiring them to pull off the road while talking on their phones wouldn't work. Is there another way to limit our liability? —D.R., Florida