Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

If your employee handbook or job-offer letters say that new hires will face a 60- or 90-day "probation period," you should consider dropping that policy or, at the very least, referring to that period in some other way.

You may not realize it, but employees could be jumping ship because of the hassle and high cost of their commutes. And commuting pains aren't easing.

Be very leery about setting rules that ban one gender or another from certain positions. Such a policy may be legal if you can prove that gender is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) for a position. But courts will likely be skeptical if the job can be done by both sexes without violating any laws or with an easy accommodation.

You don't want to play den mother to your employees, but a new trend gaining publicity may put you in that role. So-called "workplace bullying" is no longer something you can shrug off. If you see it, you'd better try to stop it.

Many employees forget—or don't realize—that employer-provided benefits make up a big portion of their compensation.

If you offer health insurance to retired employees, a new Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ruling says you can reduce or eliminate those benefits after the ex-employee becomes eligible for Medicare at age 65.

If your employees work long hours and odd shifts, expect more scrutiny into your efforts to keep those workers healthy and safe.

Disabled people find it difficult to tell prospective employers about their disability and any accommodations they need, according to the National Center for Disability Services (NCDS), www.ncds.org.

Previously, the U.S. Labor Department's Wage and Hour Division focused most of its audit efforts on selected low-wage industries with immigrant work forces and high rates of labor-law violation, such as health care, agriculture and garment manufacturing. New targets include manufacturing and service industries.

You don't need to wait until an employee leaves to hold an exit interview. You can gain valuable feedback by asking a few key questions of candidates who turned down your job offers.