Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

What's the hardest thing you've ever done as a manager? Whether you're a novice team leader or the CEO, odds are the answer is "Letting someone go." Here's some practical advice to guide you when termination seems the only solution to a performance problem:
If your employee handbook or job-offer letters say new hires will face a 60- or 90-day probation period, you should consider dropping that policy or, at the very least, referring to ...
Issue: Noncompete agreements are more easily signed than enforced. Risk: One sure way to crush your noncompete's legality is to include overly restrictive time and geographical limits. Action: Make ...
Your employment policies should never leave employees guessing about how they must comply.
That's why it's vital to use concrete terms in your
policies that discuss employee behaviors and ...
How do the employees at your organization feel about their compensation? If the answer is "Not good," a bit of explanation from you can calm those troubled waters. Fact: Only 45 ...

As the owner or sole proprietor of a small business, you reap most of the rewards. But you also run most, if not all, of the risks. So you might be hesitant to sponsor a qualified retirement plan for yourself and your employees. One reason: Creditors could gain access to your plan assets if the business ever goes under.

If you want to pay the absolute minimum to Uncle Sam, tax planning must be a year-round pursuit. With summer right around the corner, you can cash in on several key tax breaks by springing into action now. If you procrastinate until the end of the year, you'll miss out on valuable deductions and credits for yourself, your business and your family. This special report explains a dozen timely moves you should take before the leaves begin to fall.

If your employee handbook or job-offer letters say that new hires will face a 60- or 90-day "probation period," you should consider dropping that policy or, at the very least, referring to that period in some other way.

You may not realize it, but employees could be jumping ship because of the hassle and high cost of their commutes. And commuting pains aren't easing.

Be very leery about setting rules that ban one gender or another from certain positions. Such a policy may be legal if you can prove that gender is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) for a position. But courts will likely be skeptical if the job can be done by both sexes without violating any laws or with an easy accommodation.