Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

THE LAW. Job interviews are a legal minefield for HR people and managers. Your questions must avoid stepping on federal and state equal employment laws that ban discrimination on the basis ...
A small but growing number of employers use global positioning systems (GPS) to track employees. By 2006, most new cars will include GPS systems, as will cell phones. Advice: You already ...
Issue: Should you set a probation period for new employees? Risk: It can jeopardize your employment-at-will rights by implying that once the period ends, employees become "permanent." Action: Dump ...
The U.S. Transportation Department has unveiled new rules that require employers to more closely review applicants' professional driving safety records and drug-testing history. The rules also require you to make that ...
The long wait is over. Now it's time for you to act.
More than a year after proposing changes to the rules that define which employees are eligible for overtime ...

As the owner or sole proprietor of a small business, you reap most of the rewards. But you also run most, if not all, of the risks. So you might be hesitant to sponsor a qualified retirement plan for yourself and your employees. One reason: Creditors could gain access to your plan assets if the business ever goes under.

If you want to pay the absolute minimum to Uncle Sam, tax planning must be a year-round pursuit. With summer right around the corner, you can cash in on several key tax breaks by springing into action now. If you procrastinate until the end of the year, you'll miss out on valuable deductions and credits for yourself, your business and your family. This special report explains a dozen timely moves you should take before the leaves begin to fall.

If your employee handbook or job-offer letters say that new hires will face a 60- or 90-day "probation period," you should consider dropping that policy or, at the very least, referring to that period in some other way.

You may not realize it, but employees could be jumping ship because of the hassle and high cost of their commutes. And commuting pains aren't easing.

Be very leery about setting rules that ban one gender or another from certain positions. Such a policy may be legal if you can prove that gender is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) for a position. But courts will likely be skeptical if the job can be done by both sexes without violating any laws or with an easy accommodation.