Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Mass shootings and terrorism have employers on high alert. Here’s what they say they’re doing to prevent
workplace violence.
Everyone makes mistakes. If you discover you messed up, don’t hesitate to fix the error. You’ll look better in the eyes of a judge should you wind up in court.
East San Jose-based Peters’ Bakery has agreed to settle charges the bakery’s owner verbally abused and harassed a Latina employee because of her national origin.

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act decision based on a worker-friendly interpretation of the terms “sale of assets” and “going concern.” The decision makes it easier for workers to challenge lack of a WARN notice when their employer claims to have sold company assets to another firm.

Some jobs require special government physical certifications as a pre-requisite to employment. These are generally designed to make sure the employee can safely perform a job that might otherwise put the public, or the employee, at risk of harm. What happens if such an employee becomes disabled?

Many Americans have criminal records. The EEOC and local government agencies want to help former convicts start over. The movement to “ban the box” on job applications—the box those with criminal histories are supposed to check—is part of that trend. So is the EEOC’s position that barring applicants with criminal records from employment may amount to discrimination based on race or ethnicity. Employers that refuse to consider any applicant who has a criminal record risk litigation.

Do you have a method for making sure pay records are up-to-date, accurate and available? Remember, California law requires retaining pay records for three years.
Today, most people don’t stop working when the clock strikes 5 p.m. What's this going to mean for how you pay them?
The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs’ revised rules take effect today.
Starting on July 1, 2016, a new Los Angeles city ordinance began requiring Los Angeles employers with 26 or more employees to provide paid sick leave benefits. Employers with fewer than 26 employees must do so as of July 1, 2017.
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