Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Americans haven’t been this confident about their job security since before the Great Recession began in 2008.
When it comes to circumventing the Fair Labor Standards Act, innovation may be born of hardship. The latest employer scheme to avoid paying overtime, workers’ comp premiums and payroll taxes comes out of Utah and Arizona, where several jointly owned construction firms have been requiring employees to become “member/owners” of the businesses.
Two former exotic dancers will split a $250,000 award after a jury sided with them in their suit against Houston nightclub Tiffany’s Cabaret. The jury found the club illegally made the women share their tips and wrongly forced them to pay to dance there.

Apparently, TV personality Stephen Colbert wasn’t kidding about mistreating Jay the intern. Colbert’s former employer, Viacom, has agreed to settle claims by current and former interns at its Comedy Central, MTV and Nickelodeon properties.

A white police officer’s suit against the city of Ithaca has been dismissed. The officer alleged racial discrimination after he lost a promotion to a black officer.
Two recent decisions from the Supreme Court of Texas and the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals are reminders that, under Texas law, it is difficult for employers to waive arbitration agreements.
The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that premium tax credits are available to all qualified individuals, regardless of whether they buy health insurance through a state or federal exchange. The ruling leaves intact the employer free-rider penalties in the 34 states that have not established state exchanges. The case is King v. Burwell, No.  12-114.

Employers aren’t supposed to retaliate against employees who file wage-and-hour complaints against their employers. For quite some time now, there has been confusion over two things: first, whether the employee has to make a written complaint, and second, whether the complaint has to be made to a governmental agency like the Department of Labor. Now the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers New York employers, has settled the issue.

Lots of employees enjoy an after-work cocktail, but some jobs either attract people who are prone to more serious consumption or make them more likely abuse alcohol and drugs.
Here’s an important reminder for managers handling workers returning from medical leave who may qualify as disabled: Placing workers in a temporary job may be part of an accommodation but that doesn’t end the process.
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