Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Issue: If an employee believes a boss's order is illegal, she can refuse to do it. And you can't punish her for that defiance.
Risk: You could run afoul of ...
Holiday bonuses are becoming less of a holiday tradition, as 59 percent of employers won't award them this year, says a new Hewitt Associates survey. "Employers recognize that the value in ...
Issue: Some new job boards this year take their cues from dating sites, trying to match employers with applicants.
Benefit/risk: Such sites can eliminate unqualified applicants, but they're fishing in ...
If you mail HR-related info to applicants and employees, budget higher costs in 2006. The Postal Rate Commission last month approved a 2-cent increase in first-class stamps, pushing them up to ...
Issue: Employees who are negatively affected by workplace discrimination can file lawsuits, even if they aren't the targets.
Risk: The EEOC is encouraging such whistle-blower suits, which opens a new ...
Starting Jan. 1, employers can offer Roth 401(k)s, which are a hybrid of the basic 401(k) plan and the wildly popular Roth IRA accounts. With Roth 401(k)s, employees invest taxed dollars ...

It's no fun paying a hefty tax bill when you file your annual return. But Uncle Sam doesn't want to wait that long for your cash. Estimated-tax rules say you must pay a certain amount of tax during the year. If you don't, you run the risk of an underpayment penalty on top of your regular tax bill. Fortunately, you can stop the bleeding with some minor band-aids. Following is the who, what, where and when of estimated taxes ... and how to avoid penalties.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) announced that the wage and self-employment income base for the Social Security tax will rise next year.

When the employees of yesteryear needed to vent about a bad day or an obnoxious boss, they went to their local pub and shared their frustrations with whomever was in earshot. Today's employees log on to the Net and gripe in their blogs for an estimated 32 million Americans to read. With an average of 20,000 new blogs being created daily, is it any wonder employers' biggest blogging concerns are that employees will use their blogs to disparage the company or co-workers, post objectionable material/pictures, or divulge proprietary company information?  No!  So that's why they're taking proactive policy action.

For too many people, the tax season is a February-to-April affair. But trying to plan your tax strategies after Dec. 31 is as futile as a football team drawing up its game plan with two minutes left in the fourth quarter: You can't do much to affect the score.