Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Even if you ran into a stone wall in the past trying to obtain references on prospective employees, don’t give up. It’s true that some bosses are reluctant to talk about former employees because they fear lawsuits if they give a bad review. But attitudes are changing. More states are passing laws that provide immunity [...]
Are you reporting your newly hired or rehired employees to the state? Federal and state laws mandate that all employers report certain identifying information about newly hired and rehired employees to ...
Issue: Minor squabbles between employees and supervisors escalating into illegal "discipline." Risk: If left unchecked, they can escalate, resulting in discrimination or retaliation claims. Action: Use the following case ...

Q: My employees sometimes ask my advice about their personal financial affairs. That got me thinking about offering financial counseling from an outside firm as an employee benefit. Can this be offered as a tax-free fringe benefit? C.O., Detroit, Mich.

Medical costs continue to skyrocket. What's a small business owner to do?

 

In most cases, fringe benefits provided to company bigwigs are exempt from tax only if they are offered to everyone.

 

If you run a small company, it's hard to squeeze in enough exercise time during the week.

Severance plan documents sometimes stipulate that employees who are fired "for cause" are disqualified from benefits. That places a burden on plan administrators to fairly review the facts before making a benefits determination. This includes checking out the employer's policies, procedures, and enforcement. If an employer was lax in any of these areas, and benefits were denied, they may be called on the courtroom carpet for violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act  (ERISA).

The Department of Labor (DOL) issued final notice rules under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA), which contain changes to notice requirements that have been slightly altered from the proposed rules.

Now that tax-filing season is over, ask yourself one simple question: How satisfied are you with your tax adviser?

The federal government published final rules in April redefining which employees are eligible for overtime pay (see our May 17 issue). Research Recommendations hosted a telephone conference that answered questions on the new rules. Following are excerpts from the audioconference.

You may have read that legislation sailed through the House last month that would give employers more time to challenge OSHA citations and allow small businesses to recoup legal fees when they defeat an OSHA lawsuit.