Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Issue: Your organization has a responsibility to provide a safe environment for employees and customers.
Risk: Weak security efforts may lead to a "negligent security" lawsuit, an increasing problem for ...
Horror stories about negligent hiring and subsequent legal liability have prompted many managers to go the background-check route. But now, new horror stories about identity theft, scams and bad data in the files might make some managers think twice.

If you're like most small business owners, your spouse does odds and ends around the office and pitches in when you need help. This is particularly true in the summer months when other employees take vacation leave.

If you're planning to hire your spouse, he or she (and your company) still must pay federal employment taxes on the wages. But don't let that scare you away from putting your spouse on the payroll. By shifting salary from your pocket to your spouse's pocket, you can successfully pay less in employment taxes than if you earned all the income yourself.

1. Keep receipts, not a list 2. No deduction for 'common' products

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) has been known to cause employer consternation. Below you'll find the answers to a pressing HIPAA question: Does the privacy rule absolutely prohibit the disclosure of employment records containing medical information?

Whether they involve actual benefits or just the process itself, any promises made that impact an employee's expectations must be kept. If a retirement promise is broken and an employee is shortchanged, a court could get involved and make the employer stick to its original agreement.

Can older workers file disparate impact claims under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA)? On March 30, 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court answered in the affirmative.

Are you and your employees adequately protected in the event of a long-term illness? Despite the potential for dire consequences—such as exhausting their lifetime savings—few people secure long-term care insurance on their own.

The best doesn’t come along too often, but the worst, the mediocre and the merely OK show up all the time. Thus, recognizing when to say “No” is more valuable than knowing when to say “Yes.” Eliminate poor choices quickly, and you save everybody’s time.