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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

It's not uncommon to realize that employees on Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave aren't as productive as their temporary replacements. That puts you in the sticky situation of wishing you ...
THE LAW. Don't believe employees' claims about their desktop privacy. Current laws give your organization wide latitude to monitor and restrict employees' use of e-mail, the Internet and other computer ...
The death of a loved one affects more than just the people who suffer the loss; it also affects the organizations where they work. The Grief Recovery Institute estimates that employees’ grief costs U.S. companies $37.5 billion a year in lost productivity. Here’s what a survey of newly bereaved employees found: 90 percent said they [...]
Typically, employees can file Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) lawsuits no later than two years after the alleged violation. But if a worker can prove that your organization "willfully" violated ...

1. Self-employed? Deduct full health premium

Finally, self-employed people can write off 100 percent of their health insurance premiums (up from 70 percent in 2002).

Note:

You can reap significant additional tax savings by making your spouse an employee of your sole proprietorship or single-member LLC and setting up a medical expense reimbursement plan. That strategy could let you deduct all your family's health costs (including uninsured expenses) on Schedule C, plus it could lower your self-employment tax bill.

U.S. workers have stayed put, waiting out the recession. Now, 40 percent of workers plan to change jobs this year, according to a Careerbuilder.com survey. Some tips to lure the best:

Between Feb. 1 and April 30, many U.S. employers must post a summary of the number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred in their workplace last year (OSHA Form 300A, not the complete Form 300 log).

With the economic upsurge generating more hiring, it may become a "buyer's market" again. So you'll need to show your best cards to win the star applicants.

More companies now offer retention bonuses to rank-and-file workers, too, according to surveys by consultants WorldatWork and Lee Hecht Harrison.

Companies usually are liable for injuries caused by workers who are "acting within the scope of employment." You're not liable when they cause injuries on their own free time. But what about gray areas, when workers run personal errands while on company business?