Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

If you're like most employers, you breathe a little easier when 180 days have passed since you discharged an employee. You know that's how long fired workers have to file a complaint with either the EEOC or the Texas Workforce Commission if they are bringing a claim under the Texas Labor Code ...

Thirty-two percent of people surveyed by Harris Interactive said "people talking loudly at work" is one of their biggest pet peeves ...

Ignorance of the law is no excuse when it comes to deciding who’s exempt from overtime and who gets paid hourly ...

“Georgia will outperform the nation but will not dodge the slowdown” in 2007, according to George Benson, dean of the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business ...

Q. As part of our new employees' noncompete contracts, we've started including a clause that requires employees to repay the company (through payroll deduction) for training costs if they quit or are fired within one year. Are we OK legally? —S.M., Kentucky

Q. I believe that one of our employees falls within the administrative exemption under FLSA, but I'm not sure if he “regularly exercises discretion and independent judgment.” How can I make that determination? —A.C., Mississippi

Q. I run a small advertising office. A college student has asked to join our staff for the summer. She proposed to work every day for a couple months at no cost. It would be great to get some free help. Is there anything wrong with hiring her? —G.I., Maryland

Q. We fired one of our truck drivers after giving him a written warning about continued lateness in completing weekly logs. Should we have taken any other action prior to his termination? —R.W., California

Q. The job performance of one of our employees no longer meets our standards. While she used to be a good worker, she's now making a lot of errors, coming in late from time to time and not getting along with her co-workers. We've talked to her about these issues, but her performance has not improved. If we fire her for poor performance—which we would consider termination for cause—will she be eligible to collect unemployment compensation? —W.T., District of Columbia

Compelling a prisoner to work without pay is not illegal, a federal court has ruled in considering a Texas inmate's request. The prisoner worked in the prison laundry and claimed he should be paid at least the federal minimum wage ...