Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

The U.S. Labor Department’s Employee Benefits Security Administration has published a new guide that helps employers navigate the evolving practices involved in offering health savings accounts (HSA).
The U.S. government’s main survey on wages and benefits, Employer Costs for Employee Compensation, offers a good quarterly snapshot that can help you benchmark your company’s pay and perks. The latest report says employer costs for wages and benefits average $26.86 per hour.
When it comes to productivity and employee retention, it pays to create new ways to keep your employees happy. Here are three examples of small companies that keep business humming along.

401(k) plans have long been able to use automated phone systems, e-mail, and the Internet to provide required notices and allow employees to make elections and consent to distributions. Final regulations now give plans the option of conforming to the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, otherwise known as the E-SIGN Act, or sticking to their current electronic systems. The regs also expand the plans that may communicate electronically, to include health plans and health savings accounts, cafeteria plans, educational assistance plans, and plans that provide qualified transportation fringe benefits. The regs are effective for notices provided to employees on or after January 1, 2007.

Think you’ve got no time during the holidays for recruiting, and that nobody’s looking for work, anyway? Wrong! December and early January may be among the best times to hire, says Right Management Consultants VP Katherine Ponds.
Mismanaged e-mail continues to cost U.S. employers, a recent survey shows.
Ditch fears of public speaking and learn how to speak up in office meetings.
When Henry Ford announced Five-Dollar Day in 1914, it created a sensation. Overnight, the Ford Motor Co. would double the standard wage of automobile workers. Why did Ford — remembered for assembly-line automation, not employee empathy — create a new wage standard? Two basic reasons:
Increase someone’s productivity by as much as 20 percent.
As a child, Potter Palmer worked at his father’s dry goods store in a New York village, learning to set up displays and chat up customers. He loved to sell. He dreamed big. Palmer struck out for Chicago with a $3,000 family loan. This was his chance. To take advantage of it, Palmer tried strange new things: