Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Sponsors of 401(k) plans have a fiduciary obligation to prudently select and monitor their plan's investments, investment options, and third-party service providers. Understanding and evaluating fees charged by those third parties are key components of a fiduciary's responsibility. Employees also have a right to know the fees their plans pay to third-party service providers. Hammering this home, class action lawsuits have been filed against some of the country's largest employers. The lawsuits allege that plan sponsors breached their fiduciary duties by allowing third parties to charge unreasonable fees to their plans. As is inevitable, lawsuits of this type reverberate with employers of all sizes. Now is a good time to assess the fees charged to your plan.

The manager of a Tampa Victoria’s Secret store recently filed a complaint alleging that the store fired her because she was pregnant. The woman alleges that management told her the pregnancy “was going to be a problem” ...

HR professionals beware: Foul-mouthed managers are trouble, and the best policy is zero tolerance ...

Gov. Ed Rendell signed a workers’ compensation bill that establishes an Uninsured Employers Guaranty Fund and caps some legal fees, among other reforms ...

In a unionized workplace, it can be tricky when an arbitrator—while interpreting a collective-bargaining agreement with the union—second-guesses the employer’s decisions ...

One of the best ways to make sure a termination decision sticks is to adopt a consensus approach to the decision-making ...

One part of the federal law that bans job discrimination (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act) makes it illegal to retaliate against employees who engage in “protected activity,” such as filing a discrimination complaint. But here’s a key point to remember: That protected activity must be related to discrimination claims under Title VII ...

When it comes to creating workplace rules, don’t think you have to spell out every last detail. It’s OK to leave some rules intentionally vague, so you’ll have some wiggle room. Just be sure to exercise your discretion fairly ...

A former Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) administrator recently won a four-year battle over alleged racial discrimination and retaliation charges against the agency and U.S. Justice Department. He won $85,000 in damages, plus legal fees ...

Even if you think an employee’s complaint about alleged harassment doesn’t have legal merit, it makes sense to take steps to stop the offending behavior anyway. Otherwise, if the employee perceives that co-workers are targeting him for more harassment, he can quit and sue ...