Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Q. Is it legal to require that employees on FMLA leave report to us regularly on their plans to return to work? —P.R., New York

When deciding whom to promote, make sure you're using an impartial selection process to pick the best candidate. That's the only way to stay on safe legal ground ...

Q. We require, as a condition of employment, that our employees agree to resolve all disputes by binding arbitration, rather than going to court. One of my friends said a lot of the government agencies don't like those kinds of arbitration policies and one agency even decided that they were illegal. I know lots of employers have binding arbitration, so I don't think that could be right, but thought I better check. —S.T.

Pennsylvania law makes it easy to enforce noncompete contracts. But trying to make a business-interference claim against an ex-employee is almost a lost cause ...

Q. We're a small business (just eight employees) and haven't laid anyone off. But business is slow and we need to restructure. We have an employee who has worked here part time (12 hours per week) for 25 years. She is 65 years old. We have one other part-timer (10 hours per week) who has worked here just one year. We'd like to lay off both part-time employees and keep the full-time employees. Can we do that? —P.U., Georgia

If you use leased employees, you're not required to manage their FMLA leave. That's the leasing company's responsibility as the person's primary employer ...

A reader of our weekly e-mail newsletter, The HR Specialist Weekly, recently posed this question: "How do you let other employees know when you've fired someone?" Following are some of the responses from other readers ...

The top three New Year’s resolutions for people: 1. Strike a better balance between work and home life. 2. Exercise more. 3. Avoid bad relationships. Your organization can’t help workers avoid disastrous dates, but it can help with the first two items ...

You’ve no doubt hired a candidate who looks great on paper but quickly shows deficiencies. The experience he or she listed on the résumé isn’t apparent when the person starts work. Before long, you realize your mistake and fire the new employee, who then sues for discrimination ...

You and the supervisors at your organization may already know how to handle a sexual harassment complaint that appears genuine. But what should you do when you seriously doubt that a claim is legit? ...