Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Q. Our organization has a four-day annual meeting for our managers, directors and leaders from 40 offices across the United States. The evening before the meeting ends, we host a large, fun, casual theme party. During this year’s party one of the sales managers from an affiliate office became so intoxicated that she had to be held up and escorted back to her room, where a hospital medical staff member stayed with her to make sure she was OK. The following day, she skipped the remaining meeting sessions and took an early flight home. Is this grounds for dismissal?

A female executive told a jury she hit the glass ceiling after her boss created a new position above her and filled it with a male. She filed suit against her employer, an aircraft manufacturer, and was fired shortly afterward ...

Just a few months ago, the U.S. Supreme Court established a broad new legal standard for judging whether an employer has retaliated against an employee for complaining about discrimination (Burlington Northern v. White). Now, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals has applied the standard to its first retaliation case after the Supreme Court decision. The news is good for employers ...

Q. My company pays health insurance for all spouses, children and domestic partners of my co-workers. I am single and don’t have children or a domestic partner. Am I being discriminated against since they receive more benefits than I do?

Does your organization have a blanket policy of refusing to hire applicants with criminal records? If so, make sure you can explain exactly why. Because minority applicants may be statistically more likely to have criminal records, requiring a clean criminal-record history may have a disparate impact on a protected class and violate Title VII ...

Arbitration agreements, in which employees give up their rights to go to court and instead submit their cases to arbitration, can be a great way to avoid unpredictable juries, negative publicity and the expense of a full-blown lawsuit. But if the agreement isn’t worded just right, you may end up with more expense and lost time rather than less ...

Texas employees have 180 days after an alleged discriminatory act to file discrimination charges with the Texas Commission on Human Rights. So, you can get a charge tossed out if you can prove it was filed more than 180 days afterward. But what counts as a “discriminatory act”?...

Some new mothers returning to work after giving birth request time off during the workday to express and store breast milk. Some states have passed specific laws protecting nursing women from harassment and discrimination ...

Employees who think a supervisor is treating them unfairly and suspect discrimination often will look for an escape. One tactic is to ask for a transfer to another department or location. Don’t think that you’re required to acquiesce ...

Texas employees who are injured while commuting to their job sites aren’t eligible for workers’ compensation unless they can show that the employer paid for their commute or the transportation was within the employer’s control ...