Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

A frequently disregarded ADA provision often catches employers by surprise. The ADA, which prohibits discrimination of disabled people at work, also bans discrimination against employees because they "associate with" someone who is disabled ...

Casting admiring glances or making other such flirtatious gestures toward a co-worker isn't sexual harassment under the Florida Civil Rights Act. That law doesn't require employers to guarantee that employees won't ever look at each other in a way perceived as a "come-on" ...

When the threat of an employee lawsuit looms, most employers are advised to take a tough stance, fight the charges and never admit guilt. But some attorneys now advocate that an often-overlooked option of simply saying "I'm sorry" in certain situations may actually soothe feelings and even defuse legal action ...

Would your hiring managers react negatively to male employees or applicants just because they took FMLA leave to care for a newborn or a sick family member? ...

Some employers’ policies are stricter than others, such as zero-tolerance policies against theft. But it’s more important how you apply your policy than what the policy says ...

The FMLA lets qualified employees take up to 12 weeks of unpaid medical leave each year if suffering from a serious illness. The law also entitles them to reinstatement to the same or an equivalent job when they return. But what if the employee has a lingering work restriction, such as a temporary lifting limit?...

Wakefern Food Corp., owner of local ShopRite food markets, recently was hit with two employee discrimination lawsuits ...

Florida employers don’t have to pay workers’ compensation benefits for their independent contractors. Plus, they aren’t responsible for the on-the-job injuries of such workers. But make sure you keep enough “distance” from those workers so they’ll keep their independent-contractor status ...

Q. I have a question about providing honest feedback during reference requests. Is it better to defend the fact that I provided a truthful (negative) assessment, rather than trying to explain why I can't give any reference at all? Aren't we protected by negligent referral and reference immunity laws? —M.R., Utah

Q. Our nonsupervisory, hourly employees punch in using a time clock. Our supervisors write timecards. Is this dual method acceptable or could it lead to legal trouble? —A.N., New Hampshire