Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Q. Many of my former employees want me to provide post-employment references, but I'm afraid of liability. Can I ask them to sign a release giving me permission to provide references that would absolve me from any liability? —A.K., Virginia

A new law signed last month by Gov. Rendell, The Organ and Bone Marrow Donor Act, grants employers a tax credit if they offer paid organ-donor leave to their employees. State Rep. Robert Godshall (R-Montgomery) proposed the bill (HB 153) after hearing how some would-be organ donors would be deterred by potential economic losses from missing work ...

Wondering how your health care benefits measure up against those of other Michigan employers? Find out by participating in McGraw Wentworth’s 2007 Mid-Market Group Benefits Survey ...

Even if you pay employees—such as day laborers—on a daily basis, you can’t use that tactic to avoid paying overtime for hours worked beyond 40 in a week ...

Q. One of our full-time employees, age 60, is ill and expected to be out six months. We'd like to make her position part time, because we need to hire an additional part-timer in another department. Essentially, we'd like to split her full-time job into two part-time positions. Is this legal? —D.H., Texas

Q. Our company doesn't have a policy on night shifts, but we've asked one of our hourly employees to work from 1 to 9 p.m. without any supervision. If something should happen to the employee while on night duty, are we liable for it? I've checked with my state labor department and workers' comp office, and they say we're not. —L.R., Florida

Q. We understand that employees on FMLA leave don't lose investment toward retirement plans. Leave time is counted as work time. But our policy says that if employees are out for more than 30 days, their anniversary dates will change. Accrued paid-time off and vacation time will be based on the new anniversary date. Can we do this? —K.A., Connecticut

Q. At our university, the special-events supervisors must occasionally hire people. We currently don't pay for their time involved in interviewing job candidates. I think we should pay them for that time, but I was told education institutions are exempt from pay laws. Is that true? —D.D., West Virginia

Q. We are a small but growing construction company, and we don’t have formal policies in place. Recently, one of our employees was involved in an accident at a construction site. This is his third accident. After the second time, we had him sign a warning notice that said he’d be terminated if it happened again. We sent him for drug testing after this third accident and he came back positive for cocaine. We want to terminate him. But we suspended another worker who tested positive for marijuana. Can we fire him? —B.O., Pennsylvania

A recent Texas Court of Appeals case is good news for employers who run health care facilities, such as mental health centers. Reason: Patients who claim that the facility negligently hired employees who subsequently assaulted the patient will have to meet the very stringent rules on the Texas Medical Liability and Insurance Improvement Act ...