Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

You’d think the sight of customers paying retail prices with real green money would be a sight for a salesperson’s sore eyes. That apparently wasn’t the case at a Dillard’s department store in Kansas City, which is now facing a messy lawsuit after a saleswoman shunned a customer ...

One good reason to have new employees serve a probationary period is that it gives you more time to check their backgrounds and find out whether they were forthcoming on their applications ...

Q. Our company has a union contract with work rules. We also have the right in the contract to change the work rules, which the union can grieve. We recently exercised our right to add a new rule prohibiting cell phones in the plant. The union hasn’t filed a grievance, but it has filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board. It claims that we are obligated to bargain over the new rule. Are we obligated to bargain over a new rule like this?—R.S.

Pregnant employees and applicants are protected by two federal employment laws: the Pregnancy Discrimination Act and the FMLA ...

Organizations are entitled to their employee’s loyalty, but that doesn’t mean employees have to remain silent about alleged discrimination. Although it may seem disloyal, approaching a customer about a workplace problem may be a protected activity under some circumstances ...

Q. Michigan’s labor department has sent us a letter stating that a MIOSHA safety officer will be coming to inspect our facility regarding an employee’s safety complaint. Are we obligated to let the safety officer come into our plant and question our employees? Will the officer tell us who filed the complaint?—C.B.

Q. We had a full-time employee take FMLA leave to have her baby. After her 12 weeks off, she demanded a part-time schedule. We need the position to be filled full time. The shift we want her to work is the one she was working before she took FMLA leave. Do we have to let her work the schedule she wants?—E.L., Connecticut

Two new resources on federal compliance and a legislative attempt to address last week’s Supreme Court decision on pay discrimination head this week’s news from Washington.

The ink on the U.S. Supreme Court’s latest employment-law decision was barely dry before the court voted to hear yet another important employment-discrimination case—this one concerning age discrimination.

The last thing you want is for a manager to make offensive comments about an employee's age (or other protected characteristic). This is the type of "smoking gun" evidence that leads employers to settle claims rather than face a jury trial. Fortunately, most managers have enough sense to refrain from making such comments. If you're lucky, any misguided statements by managers will be considered so-called "stray remarks" that are not sufficient to support a discrimination claim. However, remarks don't always fall neatly into either the stray or not-stray category. Comments that may seem like stray remarks to a manager may be seen as evidence of bias in court. A recent age discrimination claim was sent to trial after an appeals court knocked down the employer's "stray remark" argument.