Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

If your evaluation procedures are too complicated, employees may question whether they're being treated fairly. Mild suspicions can quickly grow into expensive discrimination lawsuits, as a new court ruling shows ...

Many employers use "last-chance agreements" to give employees one final opportunity to turn around attendance, productivity and attitude problems. Here's good news if you use last-chance agreements on employees with drug and alcohol problems: The ADA and many state laws give you the leverage to keep employees clean ... and fire them if they're not ...

If you use summer interns, it's hunting time. Experts suggest asking the following questions to determine how students make decisions and manage work and deadlines ...

Your unique vantage point in HR equips you to identify managers with the potential to become company leaders. By sharing your insights with top execs, you'll help build organizational excellence and make yourself more valuable. Use these tips to alert top execs to possible future leaders they might be missing ...

Employers host employee-recognition events throughout the year, but the second Friday in March (March 10 this year) is the official Employee Appreciation Day, according to the Society for Human Resource Management ...

You may think that your organization is immune from a sex discrimination lawsuit if you hire a female employee to replace a fired female. But such "free passes" don't automatically exist ... and your supervisors should know it ...

Issue: You can use Adobe Acrobat's PDF Creator to convert old typewritten forms to digital ones.
Benefit: Save time (for you, employees and applicants), save paper and impress the boss ...

Too many employers think harassment is a problem only when it's an employee-on-employee thing. Recent court rulings prove that you can be held liable even when outsiders harass your employees. Taking action may cost you a customer, but courts say defending employees must come first ...

Employees need to prove they suffered some sort of "adverse job action" (firing, demotion, worse job conditions, etc.) to file a discrimination lawsuit. But variations in work schedules don't necessarily amount to an adverse action. That's true even if an employee's altered schedule results in fewer overtime hours ...

If you treat employees as if they're disabled, they'll garner ADA protections even if they're healthy as horses. Wait for skills testing and medical results to determine an employee's condition; don't make snap judgments ...