Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

The U.S. Supreme Court handed employers a major victory this week by clarifying that workers who claim pay discrimination must file their complaints within 180 days of the alleged offense. But this ruling could, in the short run, lead to a spike in pay-bias claims.

Rather than calming the turbulent legal waters, the revamping of the federal overtime laws in 2004 has churned up even more disputes and lawsuits ...

If you think that you can forget about a discrimination dispute just because the employee doesn't file an EEOC complaint within the allotted time, you may be in for a surprise. As a new court ruling shows, the EEOC can sue your organization years, or even decades, after the alleged discrimination took place ...

Don't think that an employee who quietly suffers name-calling for years can't sue. Courts and the EEOC won't be swayed by your argument that "he put up with it for 20 years, so how bad could it have been?" ...

The U.S. Labor Department is proposing changes to the way non-U.S. citizens are certified for permanent employment in the United States. Specifically, the government would prevent employers from shifting visas from one foreign worker to another ...

Although it may be tempting to let unproven employees "try out" a promotion to see if they'll work out, be careful of the hidden legal risks. If you treat the acting supervisor differently than other promoted employees, you could end up on the wrong end of a discrimination suit ...

Any tests you use to screen applicants should relate to the job, and you must be prepared to prove that they do. If you can't and a protected group of workers (e.g., women, minorities) tend to score poorly, you're just asking for a lawsuit ...

A growing number of high-tech workers are complaining that they're losing jobs not only to foreign workers overseas but also to foreign workers who enter the United States under the little-known L-1 visa category ...

Q. If an employee speaks Spanish and doesn’t understand English, am I required to have my handbooks and other policies translated into Spanish? Is the handbook valid if the employee signs but does not understand the content? —A.B., California

The federal job anti-discrimination law (Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act) applies to employers with 15 or more employees. So, if you have fewer than 15 workers, you may think you're automatically immune from such suits. Not so fast, says a new Supreme Court ruling ...