Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Q. We have an employee who is out with a workers’ compensation injury on a medical leave of absence. We have a job that this employee should be able to perform, but it is not the same job that he was performing when he was injured. We called him in and told him about the job, but he refuses to do the job because he doesn’t like it. Can we stop his workers’ compensation benefits?—G.J.

Q.  We temporarily allowed an hourly employee to come in early and take work home at night. We paid her for overtime on both ends. But now we’ve promoted someone else and told the hourly worker to stop coming in early and taking work home. She said she prefers working early and still does (plus she skips lunch) but reports for just 40 hours. Is she setting us up?—L.B., New York

You’ve told your first-line supervisors over and over again that crude language, insults and worse have no place in the workplace. But now an employee has filed a complaint, alleging her supervisor’s “insults” have created a hostile work environment ...

Q. The out-of-town daughter of our employee has been confined to bed rest during her pregnancy. The daughter is 24. Our employee has requested FMLA leave to be with her and take care of the grandchildren. Are we required to honor this request?—J.B.

Q. We are a small company with fewer than 20 employees. While I understand the issue of paying exempt employees full salary and docking from the PTO banks when they’re absent, is there someplace that I can go to get an example of a company policy to support a 40-hour-per-week effort from each employee?—E.R., Virginia

Recently, attorneys have added “unjust enrichment” to the growing list of legal claims lobbed at employers. Simply put, employers who receive a benefit from an employee can be sued if the employer’s retention of that benefit is inequitable ...

You probably have a policy requiring employees to call in when they need time off to deal with health issues or face termination for abandoning their jobs. But don’t expect your procedure to trump the FMLA ...

The Michigan Court of Appeals recently ruled that a Grand Trunk Western Railroad employee who signed a liability release for asbestosis in return for a cash settlement could not sue later on when he developed lung cancer ...

Under the FMLA, employers who don’t ask for a second or third certification of an employee's serious health condition aren’t forever barred from challenging the employee’s condition, as a recent Michigan case shows ...

Reductions in force (RIFs) happen for a reason—usually financial. To keep legal fees and jury awards from mooting savings, be sure to document why a RIF is necessary and who should get pink slips ...