Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

The 280 employees at Boland, Inc., a Rockville, Md., air conditioning company, have run out of excuses to do at least a minimum amount of exercise each day. Reason: Two years ago, the company adopted Rick’s Quick Fit, a 15-minute workout that employees can do in their work clothes ...

Q. We let employees take short breaks to smoke outside or even have a chiropractic adjustment at the clinic next door. Employees are on the clock. Could we be responsible for their health problems related to smoking or injury from spinal adjustments? Should we just require paid breaks be taken indoors? —H.R., Missouri

Q. We employ sales and service reps who travel and service stores around the country. They work from their home offices, use their own cars and communicate with us via phone. We classify them as exempt. Is this correct? (Most reps are required to spend at least eight hours at each location. Some drive three hours or longer to get to each store. We encourage overnight stays under these circumstances.) —L.C., Oklahoma

Q. One of our managers resigned a month ago, but she applied for FMLA leave a day before her resignation. Are we under any obligation to return her to a position she resigned from? Are we obligated to offer her a job when FMLA expires? —T.K., Massachusetts

Q. In the December 2000 issue, you discussed the topic of employees with body odor. We also have a staff member with body odor so bad that other staff members have complained and even threatened to leave the agency. The employee has been disciplined several times and required to go home without pay until she agrees to comply with the dress code. At what point can we legally terminate her? —A.S., Michigan

Q. An employee in our plant was directed by a replacement line supervisor to use a machine that he wasn't trained to operate. The employee stuck his hand into the machine to clear a jam and was injured. The plant supervisor fired the employee while he was still in the hospital for operating machinery he hadn't been trained on. Does the employee have a right to sue us if he was actually ordered by the line supervisor to do this job? —K.C.

Q. Are there any questions we cannot or should not ask a reference when screening applicants? —B.B., Louisiana

The Texas Insurance Commission filed charges against consulting giant Mercer HR Consulting and its client, the Houston Independent School District, claiming the company had charged the school district $20 million since 2000 and then gave the district more than $800,000 in rebates ...

New York employers now have more incentive to move workers' compensation cases along quicker if the case includes accusations that the employer retaliated against employees who filed a work-related injury claim ...

Hudson County's Living Wage Law has survived a constitutional challenge brought by a county contractor. The suit alleged that the law imposed restrictions on some businesses but not others, which violated the 14th Amendment's equal protection clause ...