Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

If your organization's supervisors tend to ignore all that "HR talk" about FMLA leave, here's one way to get their attention: Point out that, in addition to suing your organization, employees can sue their bosses (and HR directors!) personally for FMLA-related mistakes ...

When it comes to employment-law cases, if you think your organization will settle the case (rather than go to trial), do it as early in the discussions as possible. It could end up saving you big bucks ...

Generally, workers' compensation won't cover Florida employees when they're injured after leaving the workplace. But that's not the case if the employee left the premises in an emergency to save life or property related to the business ...

Even though some provisions of the new landmark pension law don't take effect for 16 months, HR professionals need to start educating themselves immediately. The changes amount to the most sweeping reforms of pension law in more than 30 years ...

How do employees at your organization feel about their compensation? If the answer is “Not good,” a bit of explanation from you or their supervisors can calm those troubled waters and help reduce turnover ...

When employees complain about a sexually hostile environment, it pays to remedy the situation … fast. That’s true even if you don’t believe the actions would amount to illegal harassment ...

What do you do if you think an employee, especially one whose performance is declining, could benefit from taking FMLA leave? Do you plant the suggestion or wait until the employee approaches you? The fact is, you can suggest FMLA leave for a serious health condition and not run afoul of the ADA ...


It’s probably career suicide for lawyers to sue their own firms, but that’s what Aaron Charney did. And now all of cyberspace knows about it ...

When Florida courts interpret employment contracts, they look first and foremost to the contract language. If it’s clear and unambiguous, they enforce the terms strictly. But if the court questions the meaning of some terms, it will interpret them in a way that benefits the employee ...

Q. Our employees punch in 15 minutes or less before their warehouse shifts begin. We pay them starting at their scheduled start time. Also, our employees are scheduled for 30-minute lunch breaks, but some punch in and out for lunch within 10 or 15 minutes. Our company pays the full lunch time, regardless of what is punched. Is this OK? —J.W., Indiana