Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

When it comes to evaluating applicants, you can consider factors like evidence of the employee’s commitment to the job and the likelihood he won’t stick around. That’s true even if it means you don’t hire an older applicant who worked for your organization in the past and received good reviews ...

In August, President Bush signed the Pension Protection Act of 2006, which includes many benefits-related amendments to the Internal Revenue Code and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) ...

Q. How do you pay hourly employees who are traveling on a day that's not considered a workday, like Saturday or Sunday? What if they normally have a 10-minute commute to the office but instead they have to go to the airport, and the airport is an hour from their home?

While at-will employment is the standard in Pennsylvania, the right to fire an employee with or without cause is not absolute. Your organization can be sued under state law if former employees can show that they were fired in retaliation for exercising a right protected by Pennsylvania law ...

Q. Our new plant manager wants me to revise our sexual harassment policy to require that complaints be in writing. He says this will formalize the procedure and help ensure that only valid complaints are filed. I don’t think this is a good idea. Is it?

Q. One of our employees badly hurt himself when he tripped over some equipment that had been left by the building maintenance. Workers’ comp covered his medical bills and lost wages, but he also sued the building for negligence. Now we have a letter from the office building demanding that we defend them in the lawsuit and telling us we are responsible. How can that be? I thought we were protected by workers’ comp from any suit involving an employee injury?

Unfortunately, it takes an incident like the shootings at Virginia Tech for employers to seek information about securing their workplaces. But then many abandon their efforts a few weeks later as the media attention dies down. It's imperative that employers are proactive because "if you react, it's going to be bad," stressed Paul Viollis, CEO of Risk Control Strategies, a nationally recognized threat management and risk assessment firm headquartered in New York City. "Don't ever think it won't happen to you."

Q. We have a position open in our sales department for someone who will be planning and executing company-sponsored events, most of which would take place outside normal 9-to-5 working hours. Is there a way we can ask about the applicants’ family situations and make it clear that missing these events because of family obligations would not be tolerated?

Q. Our company uses the sheriff’s office to run criminal background checks on all finalists for employment. Our application form notifies the applicants that their criminal histories might be reviewed, but we do not provide any further notice to them. Our new personnel director is adamant that this practice is in violation of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Is she correct?

When it comes to co-worker sexual harassment, it’s not enough to “fix” the problem by transferring the harasser. If you don’t also investigate the underlying complaint, expect a lawsuit when the harasser strikes again ...