Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Wall Street securities firm LaBranche & Co. agreed to pay former trading assistant Peter Servidio $500,000 to settle his disability harassment lawsuit ...

Make sure your managers and supervisors know that politics and religion are individual choices and don't belong in the workplace. Otherwise, you could face stiff fines or penalties under New Jersey's new Worker Freedom from Intimidation Law ...

Domestic violence isn't always domestic. It comes to the workplace as lost productivity, excessive absenteeism, employee depression, increased health costs and, in the worst-case scenario, as violence at the workplace ...

Employers used to train their workers to prepare for upcoming promotions. Nowadays, more companies invest time and resources in full-scale succession planning for their high-potential employees ...

The U.S. Labor Department recently unveiled an interactive Web site to help guide employers through the maze of federal health benefit laws ...

Q. Are holidays that fall within the scheduled FMLA leave counted as leave? —L.F., Washington

How do four days translate into 19 months? That was the math that left Reliance Electric Company, based in Greenville, S.C., scratching its head after a workers’ compensation ruling ...

When it comes to promotions and wage increases, it pays to spell out for employees exactly how the process works. That way, you’re less likely to lose a failure-to-promote case or a pay-discrimination suit. ...

Florida’s population is the oldest in the United States. So perhaps it comes as no surprise that older workers in the state are becoming increasingly litigious in filing Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) lawsuits ...

Q. Regarding the “learned professional” exemption, is it safe to say that a person with a four-year degree would be considered in that category, but a person with an associate's or two-year degree would not? —Marilyn, Pennsylvania