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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Q. We've had a number of suspicious injuries at work this year. We don't want to jump to conclusions, but how can we determine if these injuries are part of a workers' comp insurance fraud scheme? —K.H., Mississippi

You know the workplace should be free of racially or sexually charged comments and that supervisors most certainly shouldn't engage in such banter. But you can't wipe prejudice out of every employee's mind ...

HR professionals in New York have worked hard in recent years to try to improve the state's expensive workers' compensation system. But you'll have to wait at least another year for reform ...

Don't think that leaving the final firing decision to someone in company headquarters will shield your organization from a discrimination lawsuit. Even if the ultimate decision-maker doesn't know the race, sex or age of the employee in question, the fired employee can still file a discrimination claim if he or she can point to lower-level bias that tainted the decision ...

When you terminate an employee for refusing to accept a schedule change, that person typically isn't eligible for unemployment compensation. But if your organization makes one little mistake in such circumstances, it could be on the hook for benefits ...

Don't write off employee training just because your training budget is somewhere between slim and none. You might think affordable (or free) training is hard to come by, but that's not true, says Linda Newell, director of learning and development for Policy Studies Inc. ...

To thank employees for working 10-hour days during the busy tax season, RSM McGladrey gives them back some of their time: four hours of it, to be exact ...

To be eligible for FMLA leave, employees must work for your organization for at least 12 months. But take note: Those months don’t need to be consecutive ...

It’s important to know how your responsibilities differ under the ADA and the FMLA. The ADA requires you to allow part-time work as an accommodation only if doing so is reasonable for your company’s operations. But under the FMLA, employees have the unconditional right to intermittent leave, including working part-time for an extended period ...

If employees are injured while traveling to or attending a work-related conference, they’re probably entitled to workers’ compensation benefits ...