Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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The percentage of employees receiving promotions increased to 9% in 2014, up from 7% in 2010 according to a new “Promotional Guidelines” survey released by the total rewards nonprofit WorldatWork.
What should you do if an employee has a disability that prevents him for doing his job? The ADA says you must try to find a reasonable accommodation. But who decides what’s reasonable?

When a government employee is arrested and charged with a crime related to her job, most public employers take some form of action—typically suspending the employee pending trial. If they are found guilty, they usually are terminated. Then the employee is entitled to “some sort of a hearing,” according to Supreme Court precedent. But what if criminal charges wind up being dropped?

A supervisor’s single threat leading to a salary deduction could cost your company millions.

Turnover is costly and time consuming, so you should do everything in your power to coach employees to turn around poor performance and behaviors. However, if after several attempts to rehabilitate the following types, you see no improvement, you may need to cut them loose to protect the morale and productivity of the rest of your staff.

What first impression do you give new employees? You can start new hires feeling organized and in the know (before their first days) by sending a welcome package in the mail.

When it comes to workplace wellness programs, the old adage that you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him drink is true. Only about 24% of those who work for large employers that offer wellness programs actually participate in them.

Every HR pro knows there are some questions you just can’t ask and topics you can’t raise during job interviews. But what if the applicant brings up an off-limits subject?
Employees who claim they were victims of a sexually hostile work environment don’t have to provide an exhaustive list of alleged hostile acts. Details can be provided later.
An employee who tries to internally report alleged wrongdoing and is then fired can pursue internal remedies—and then go directly to court with her discharge and retaliation claims.