Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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The hiring stakes are particularly high for small businesses. That’s why about two-thirds of small business owners reported in a recent survey that they ask job candidates to undergo drug tests before being hired.
Consulting firms Accenture and Oliver Wyman have estimated that by 2018, private exchanges will provide health coverage for around 40 million individuals. Here are the benefits.
Sal’s Mexican Restaurant in Fresno, California has agreed to settle a sexual harassment complaint filed by a former hostess. According to the complaint, the hostess was a teenager when a male supervisor continually propositioned her for sexual favors, grabbed her and required her to give him hugs and back rubs as part of her duties.
Sometimes, a supervisor harbors prejudices that aren’t obvious. Always investigate before firing an employee who claims she’s in trouble because of her boss’s biases. If ­others agree there is a problem, you had better pay attention.
A former New York Police Depart­­ment officer of mixed-race ancestry is accusing the department of tolerating racial bias, alleging that co-workers on the NYPD’s elite scuba diving team harassed him.
Q. What documentation is necessary before disciplining an employee?
Here’s a warning on discharge timing: If you happen to make the final termination decision right after the employee files an EEOC charge, timing alone may be enough to send the case to trial.

You need clear lines of communication so employees can complain about workplace problems. That can protect you if an employee quits because of alleged harassment and then applies for unemployment benefits. He won’t be eligible if he never gives you a chance to fix the problem. Not using the company complaint process pretty much means the em­­ployee didn’t give his employer a chance, blocking benefits.

Q: “One of our general managers in Oklahoma hired an individual to lift metal parts off a cutting table to place on pallets. We found out that the new hire is suing his former employee for an alleged back injury. Can we terminate the employee for not letting us know he had a back injury? He said that he was qualified to perform the work and has been lifting the parts for a week." – Vincent, Louisiana

Aside from technical skills acquired through education and training, employers seek applicants with “soft skills” above all else.
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