Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Current and prospective federal contractors that violate employment laws could be barred from doing business with Uncle Sam if new proposed rules from the Department of Labor go through.
Here's your monthly quiz on HR trends and issues.
The Court has ruled in favor of the EEOC in a case that pitted fashion retailer Abercrombie & Fitch against a teenager who wasn’t hired after wearing a Muslim headscarf to a job interview.

If you’re looking for incentives to get managers and supervisors to pay attention during FMLA training sessions, look no further. Simply point out that they can be held personally liable if they deny FMLA benefits to which an employee is entitled ...

What do you expect an employee to do at the end of approved FMLA leave? Clarify that it’s the employee’s responsibility to notify the employer and check his schedule when he receives medical clearance. Then, if the employee ignores your instructions and doesn’t show up, it’s willful misconduct—making him ineligible for unemployment benefits.
U.S. workers are feeling good about their jobs again, the Society for Human Resource Management discovered in its latest Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey.

Employees who need FMLA leave must notify their employers either 30 days before, if the need is foreseeable, or as soon as “practicable” if the need is unforeseeable. Thus, elective surgery requires 30 days’ notice, while emergency surgery does not. Lots of employers, however, have far less formal rules in place. Some allow a simple doctor’s note to stand in as a request for FMLA leave.

While public employees typically have greater protections on the job than employees working in the private sector, they don’t have unlimited protection from interference with their jobs.
A Chicago-area staffing agency that checked almost all the boxes on the EEOC’s what-not-to-do list has agreed to settle two lawsuits filed on behalf of temp workers.
Choice Hotels, Marriott and State Farm Insurance have joined a growing list of large employers quitting the far suburbs and moving office complexes closer to downtown.