Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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The U.S. Department of Labor claims a recent enforcement initiative in the oil fields of West Texas and Eastern New Mexico has resulted in workers recovering $1.3 million in lost wages. The DOL Wage and Hour Division oil and gas initiative began in late 2014.
Two participants in Merrill Lynch’s management development program are suing the firm, alleging they were not paid for overtime they worked during the intensive training period.
In her second State of the City address, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges called for more regular work schedules, more overtime pay and greater access to paid sick days.
The long-awaited rewrite of federal rules governing overtime pay for salaried executive, administrative and professional employees inched closer to enactment on May 5, when the U.S. Department of Labor forwarded a proposed final version to the Office of Management and Budget, which assesses the fiscal impact of government initiatives.
The long-awaited rewrite of federal rules governing overtime pay for salaried executive, administrative and professional employees took one step closer to becoming reality on May 5.
One of the worst things you can do when facing a lawsuit is to ignore legal paperwork that comes your way. As one employer recently learned, missing a single deadline can mean you have no defense and simply have to cough up damages.
C&H Collins-Hartwell Programs, a Southern California provider of medical day care, must pay 32 employees $344,000 in back pay and damages after the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division found it only paid straight time to workers who worked more than 40 hours in a week.
With technological advances, just about every job involves using computers or computerized machinery. That doesn’t mean an employee whose job it is to repair such equipment is an exempt computer professional. Fixing things like printers and copiers—even the most technologically advanced ones—is hourly work, making the employee eligible for overtime.
Employers must follow strict rules if they want to rectify misclassification of employees and make up their unpaid overtime. Don’t expect to just cut them a check and put a note on the paystub.
After a series of rulings dismissing overtime claims that didn’t specify exact alleged overtime worked, word is likely to get out that there’s a new, convenient way to track those hours.
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