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Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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In a stark reminder that the FLSA carries personal liability, three executives at Belton-based High Performance Ropes of America were convicted of felonies for their part in a scheme to exploit undocumented workers.
Beginning Jan. 1, 2015, staffing agencies and other third-party employers must pay minimum wages and overtime to home health care workers, including certified nursing assistants, home health aides, personal care aides, caregivers and certain companions.
It just got more complicated to calculate the overtime pay you owe a misclassified employee. In Black v. SettlePou P.C., the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a district court’s ruling concerning the proper methodology for calculating damages when an employee is misclassified as exempt.
Can’t convince management that they shouldn’t ignore an overtime lawsuit? Share this horror story.
Avoid costly litigation by reviewing how you classify your em­­ployees as exempt or nonexempt. If you discover you have made a mistake, fix it right away. You’ll cut your misclassification liability.
A federal judge has ruled that federal labor law covers strippers at Rick’s Cabaret in midtown Manhattan. As a result, they must be paid the minimum wage and are entitled to overtime when they work more than 40 hours in a week.
Harris Health System in Houston will pay out more than $4 million in back pay after it failed to include incentive pay when calculating overtime for thousands of hourly staff members.
Interior Magic of California, a car detailing service in Riverside County, will have to pay $292,000 in back wages and liquidated damages to 205 current and former employees, plus $34,408 in civil penalties to polish its image following a U.S. Department of Labor investigation.
Q. When our business gets busy, is it legal for us to require our nonexempt employees to work overtime on occasion?
Here’s a case that should send chills down your spine if you don’t keep meticulous records of every hour worked. A court has allowed a case to proceed based on little more than a worker’s vague allegation that she wasn’t paid overtime for hours in excess of 40 per week.
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