Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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Under proposed regulations, staffing agencies that send health care workers into clients’ homes would be fully covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act. In-home health care workers who are employed by families would retain their FLSA exemption.
You don’t have to pay hourly employees for meal breaks of 30 minutes or more, as long as they are completely relieved of their duties during the break. Many employers automatically de­­duct the meal period from time worked. But make sure there’s an easy way for employees who occasionally work through their meal breaks to report the additional paid time.
Q. What’s the definition of a standard workweek? One of our employees claims that overtime is defined as anything over eight hours per workday. Is he correct?
The California Supreme Court has issued a long-awaited decision in a case addressing the “administrative/production worker” dichotomy in determining if an employee meets the requirements for the administrative employee exemption from overtime under the California Wage Orders.

In an attempt to right what he ­­per­­ceives to be a wrong-headed Supreme Court decision, Presi­dent Obama is asking the DOL to change FLSA regulations covering home health care workers. Those workers have been exempt from the law since 1974 when the DOL lumped the workers into a “companion” category along with baby sitters and nannies.

A federal court hearing a Fair Labor Standards Act case has ruled that an em­­ployee’s immigration status is irrelevant and can’t be mentioned to the jury.
Q. We pay a bonus for not using accrued sick leave. Does that count when determining an employee’s regular rate of pay for overtime purposes?
An increasing number of those managers are filing FLSA lawsuits, claiming they should be classified as nonexempt, hourly employees—and, thus, due overtime—because they spend most of their time doing the same tasks as their subordinates. But that’s not the test.
In an attempt to right what he perceives to be a wrong-headed Supreme Court decision, Presi­­dent Obama is asking the U.S. Depart­­ment of Labor to change FLSA regulations covering home health care workers.
When claims involve unpaid overtime or misclassification, attorneys representing employees naturally want to handle the case as a class or collective action. Some employers think that if they include an arbitration agreement in their terms and conditions of em­­ploy­­ment, a wage-and-hour claim has to go to arbi­­tra­­tion as an individual claim. That’s not necessarily true.
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