HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

Employers can’t punish employees for complaining about alleged discrimination or harassment. That’s true even if the complaint doesn’t pan out, as long as the employees complained in good faith. But judges don’t want employees to use the threat of a retaliation lawsuit as a way to circumvent fair discipline, either. There’s a way for employers to get judges on their side.

When you warn supervisors not to retaliate against employees who complain about alleged discrimination, include this reminder: Seemingly little things—like increasing the employee’s workload or nit-picking about performance issues—can lead to a retaliation lawsuit.

Here’s a big benefit to having a strong anti-harassment policy: The policy’s very existence helps protect employers against false claims. That’s because employees won’t be able to say they endured years of harassment and didn’t know how or to whom to report it. The key is making sure employees know about your policy.

Before an employee can claim his employer retaliated, he has to show he engaged in a protected activity. But vague claims aren’t enough.
Q. Last year, Christmas fell on a Saturday, and one of my employees who normally works Monday through Friday asked me if he would receive an extra day of pay. Are Texas employers required to provide employees with certain paid holidays?
Can someone claim they’re so disabled they need Social Security benefits, yet still tell an employer they can perform a job’s essential functions? Sounds fishy, right? A judge thought so.
For-profit education company Nobel Learning Centers (NLC), has agreed to settle charges it excluded disabled children from its programs in violation of the ADA. Although the settlement involves ADA public-access issues, it has important implications for employers.
Think if someone complains to HR and you just kick it up the chain of command, the problem will just take care of itself? Think again.

Like people, some workplaces welcome huggers. Others prefer a smartly extended right hand. "To hug or not to hug" is the question ... and here's the answer.

The immigration law landscape keeps changing, and employers must keep up. Now a new risk is emerging: Clever attorneys have begun filing RICO Act lawsuits, alleging that some employers are essentially running “mob” operations by knowingly hiring illegal immigrants.