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HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

Q. I am the HR director for a large company. We recently realized that we have not been providing nonexempt employees with any breaks during the day (other than a lunch break). What should we do?
I’ve seldom, if ever, negotiated a separation or settled an employment dispute for an employer without insisting that the signed agreement include a nondisparagement clause. The reality, however, is that a clause in a contract is only as good as one’s ability to enforce it after it has been breached. That’s not as easy as it once was.

The New Jersey Supreme Court has handed disgruntled employees a big weapon to use against their employers. The court ruled that Joyce Quinlan was within her rights to photocopy company documents—some of which were confidential—to use in a lawsuit against Curtiss-Wright, the aerospace company where she once served as executive director of human resources.

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced that it has reached a settlement with the Hoover Company—which manufactures vacuum cleaners in El Paso—resolving allegations that its employment eligibility verification process discriminates against legal, permanent residents of the United States.

It happens: A supervisor wants to discipline an employee, but HR or upper management nixes the idea because it knows something the boss doesn’t. Perhaps the employee had suffered discrimination in the past and was placed in a new position for a fresh start. Be prepared for legal fallout if you wind up disciplining the supervisor.

If an internal investigation reveals that the employee whose complaint launched the process was also engaged in improper behavior (or was, in fact, the person to blame for the situation), don’t hesitate to punish appropriately. As long as you act in good faith, a court is unlikely to conclude the punishment was retaliation for complaining in the first place.

Employees often reveal their true feelings during an exit interview, and they frequently wind up burning bridges in the process. Smart employers take notes during exit interviews, especially if they hear something that makes them wonder whether the employee should ever have been hired in the first place, let alone rehired for any future openings.

Employers are supposed to accommodate all religions and their practices when reasonable. If you don’t train managers to handle accommodation requests with dignity, you may find yourself facing a religious discrimination lawsuit.
Tony’s Restaurant, a venerable eatery in Alton, Ill., outside St. Louis, has agreed to settle sexual harassment charges brought by the EEOC on behalf of three teenage girls who claimed they were victimized by a member of the family that has owned the restaurant for more than 50 years.

Here’s a tip that can save you from a nasty retaliation lawsuit following the transfer of an employee who has claimed sexual harassment. If she’s the one requesting the move, be sure to document that request very carefully. She may later claim that the transfer was retaliation for complaining.