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HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

The NCAA basketball tournament may be done, but the “Final Four Biggest Workplace Headaches for 2011” competition continues. Read up on four of the most vexing HR problems, and then cast your vote for the winner—the one that makes your work life miserable.
Question: “I decided to apply for a management job. I expected to receive the same salary as my friend, who has a similar position with another team. When I got the promotion, my new boss didn’t say how much my raise would be. It turns out that I not only make less than my friend, but I also work about 50% more hours. I want to transfer to a different department, but I am not sure how to go about it.”
Maintaining personnel records used to be a whole lot simpler. In fact, any HR department that wanted to be absolutely safe on the subject simply issued a “keep everything” policy. But now, that same “keep everything” strategy can cost you as much as a lawsuit. Maybe even more.
With unemployment still floating above 9%, it’s a bit easier to find good employees. But keeping the best people never has been and never will be easy. What can you do to keep them around? A recent Harvard Business Review pointed to these key retention mistakes and solutions to fix them:
The challenges facing HR pros who specialize in talent, compensation and benefits are dramatically different today than they were just a year ago. At Deloitte Consulting, we call it “the talent paradox”—the apparent contradiction that occurs when unemployment is still relatively high, yet companies still are seeing significant shortages in critical talent areas.
Warn managers and supervisors: They must not refer to an employee’s religious beliefs when taking any adverse employment action. That’s true even if the decision being discussed involves a dispute over a religious accommodation.
The FMLA is a complicated law that can trip up even the most experienced HR professional. And sometimes it may not be apparent that an employee didn’t get the leave he was entitled to until after his legal complaint is in full swing. Fortunately, there’s still something you can do to cut the potential liability.
With some employees, the problem isn't a matter of ability, it's a matter of attitude. This can manifest itself in everything from quiet disobedience to outright insubordination. How should you respond?
The U.S. Supreme Court last month widened the circle of people who can bring retaliation lawsuits under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. As a result, HR and supervisors everywhere must be extra cautious about handing out discipline or terminations that could be construed as some sort of retaliation.
Keep the size of a PowerPoint file low with these three tactics ... Put a halt to communication overload by limiting the number of people you add to any group or process ... Customize the toolbar of your web browser, so handy little functions appear as icons across the top.