HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

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A quick scan of the world’s 156 million blogs reveals plenty of employees discussing their work. Sometimes that spells legal trouble for employers. By implementing an effective company blogging policy, you may avoid many of the pitfalls.
A major focus of emergency planning concerns how to help people with disabilities. However, employers must remember that federal laws may restrict what employers can do in emergencies.
When asked to provide FMLA certification of their serious health condition from a health care provider, some employees may realize they can’t. One answer? Fake it. What’s an employer to do? There are several approaches you can take.
Test your knowledge of recent trends in employment law, comp & benefits and other HR issues with our monthly mini-quiz.

Because absenteeism typically comes under the "minor problem" category, the first step is a precounseling session between the individual and his supervisor. In this session the supervisor determines if the employee understands the company's policy on absences. The positive discipline approach then consists of the following stages:

There’s no guarantee your em­­ployees’ personal devices are as well-protected as company-issued de­­vices. To ensure the safety of employees' smartphones and continued access to your company’s information, take these six steps before allowing employees to use them for work.
Social media can be a double-edged sword for many companies. Use these three tips to leverage the benefits and minimize the risk of social media:

You know this employee—the one who’s never happy and always finds something to complain about. It may be tempting to ignore repeated complaints, but that’s probably a mistake. Carefully document all her gripes. Those records could come in handy later if she files a lawsuit.

Here’s something to remember the next time you agonize over discharging an employee for breaking a rule: While you should treat all employees honestly, you don’t have to conduct a mini trial to determine “guilt.” It’s enough to believe you had a legitimate reason to fire the employee—even if it later turns out you were wrong.

You never know which employee will file a discrimination lawsuit. These surprise lawsuits often allege that the employer disciplined ­others outside the employee’s protected class less severely for the same transgression. Protect your organization by providing detailed reasons for any discipline at the time it occurs.