HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

The DOL has unveiled a first-of-its-kind arrangement: an attorney-referral partnership with the American Bar Association to help more employees file FMLA and FLSA lawsuits. Find details on this new program, as well as links to HR Specialist resources that can keep you from becoming a target of this looming legal dragnet.
The National Labor Relations Board has settled with a company that fired an employee for posting negative comments about a boss on her Facebook page. The case seems to signal that employee communications that happen via social media constitute protected activity under federal law. Does your social media policy go too far?

How do you decide between two equally worthy candidates? When in doubt, hire the person with the best writing skills, says Kris Dunn, VP of People for software firm DAXKO and author of “The HR Capitalist” blog. Here’s why:

Pasta maker Barilla America scored a big “zero” with employees last year: zero work stoppages due to faulty processes, plus overall employee turnover decreased to 8.1%. Reason: A $50 million overhaul of the organization’s 18-year-old IT systems and work processes gave employees the tools they needed to increase speed and improve efficiency.
A triple-whammy of forces—new laws, new EEOC outreach programs and ongoing economic malaise—helped push the number of employee job discrimination claims to the highest annual total in the EEOC’s 45-year history.
A co-worker makes Donna feel uncomfortable by spewing judgmental comments about her life choices. Donna wonders what to do about it. Is the HR department obligated to fix the problem? Or does this situation call for a frank co-worker-to-co-worker conversation?
Question: "I am a Realtor's assistant, hired to do minor admin duties and prospecting on commission.  Two months ago, my boss was put on bed rest and gave birth. Since then, I have been doing nearly all a Realtor does (with no pay increase): client contact, open houses, paperwork, taking pictures, handling weekend calls--often I have to google to find the answers! I use my own computer, car and cell phone. My boss even asks me to drive her and her children after hours! What’s worse: she told me to lie to clients to cover up for her condition. I cannot afford to quit until I find another job. How do I handle her personal demands without burning a bridge?" - Christina

As an HR pro, you may have had to guide managers through tough decisions about which functions, jobs and people must be preserved as your organization digs in to survive tough economic times. Don’t neglect your own department!

The Supreme Court on Jan. 24 ruled that the fiancé of a woman who filed an EEOC discrimination complaint was protected from retaliation by their mutual employer and can now sue for retaliation. The case has important implications for all employers: It's more important than ever to make sure your discipline policies pass the no-retaliation test.

Are you sure your company is doing everything it can to prevent lawsuits? Start by looking at how you react to discrimination complaints. If you know exactly what to do from the moment an employee first complains until he or she files a federal lawsuit, there’s no need to read further. But if you hesitated for even a moment, keep reading.