HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

Page 100 of 368« First...10203099100101110120130...Last »

It happens: A supervisor wants to discipline an employee, but HR or upper management nixes the idea because it knows something the boss doesn’t. Perhaps the employee had suffered discrimination in the past and was placed in a new position for a fresh start. Be prepared for legal fallout if you wind up disciplining the supervisor.

If an internal investigation reveals that the employee whose complaint launched the process was also engaged in improper behavior (or was, in fact, the person to blame for the situation), don’t hesitate to punish appropriately. As long as you act in good faith, a court is unlikely to conclude the punishment was retaliation for complaining in the first place.

Employees often reveal their true feelings during an exit interview, and they frequently wind up burning bridges in the process. Smart employers take notes during exit interviews, especially if they hear something that makes them wonder whether the employee should ever have been hired in the first place, let alone rehired for any future openings.

Employers are supposed to accommodate all religions and their practices when reasonable. If you don’t train managers to handle accommodation requests with dignity, you may find yourself facing a religious discrimination lawsuit.
Tony’s Restaurant, a venerable eatery in Alton, Ill., outside St. Louis, has agreed to settle sexual harassment charges brought by the EEOC on behalf of three teenage girls who claimed they were victimized by a member of the family that has owned the restaurant for more than 50 years.

Here’s a tip that can save you from a nasty retaliation lawsuit following the transfer of an employee who has claimed sexual harassment. If she’s the one requesting the move, be sure to document that request very carefully. She may later claim that the transfer was retaliation for complaining.

Employees who report concerns that co-workers are breaking the law may view themselves as whistle-blowers—and may believe that makes them untouchable if they themselves have done something wrong. Not true!
Unfortunately, many lawsuits come down to one person’s word against another’s. That’s powerful incentive for a company rule requiring at least two managers to participate in any discharge. Reason: They can back each other up.
There’s a way to make it easier to get severance agreements for older workers to stick. Instead of a general severance agreement for most employees, and a special ADEA-compliant one for older workers, use a uniform agreement that complies with the ADEA for all severance agreements. That’s what one employer recently did. When the former employee who signed the agreement tried to get out of it, the court refused.
Sometimes, a candidate stands out as a great potential hire. Whatever it is that signals this is a good hire, make sure you note it in your interview documentation. Otherwise, it may be hard to justify the decision if another applicant who met the basic job requirements sues and alleges some form of discrimination.
Page 100 of 368« First...10203099100101110120130...Last »