HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

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Many business leaders are clueless about how they come across to their employees. Your mistakes could be crushing morale, sinking productivity and increasing turnover. Accord­ing to a recent Wall Street Journal report, here are five key questions to ask yourself to see if your management skills need improving:
Perhaps nothing strikes more fear in an HR manager’s heart than learning that employees have filed a class-action wage-and-hour lawsuit alleging they were improperly classified as exempt employees. Your best defense is to be proactive about pay issues. Conduct regular reviews to make sure positions throughout your organization are properly classified as hourly or salaried.

Sometimes, HR professionals have to make judgment calls about who is telling the truth. In fact, just about every workplace investigation requires assessing the credibility of employees, co-workers and managers who disagree about what happened. Take, for example, an employee who complains about a supervisor’s harassment or hostility.

It’s more important than ever now for HR professionals to independently check supervisors’ disciplinary recommendations to ensure that they have no ulterior motives. That’s because the U.S. Supreme Court, in a much-anticipated “cat’s paw” ruling, said that an employer can be found liable for the discriminatory intent of supervisors who influence—but don’t ultimately make—an adverse employment decision.
While some politicians continue to call for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act health care reform law, employers (and HR pros) must proceed as if that won't happen, says a noted health policy expert. Will companies take advantage of a relative lull in reform implementation to plan ahead? Or will they decide to scrap health benefits, banking on reform to insure their employees?

If you’re considering so-called alternative dispute resolution, be sure to have an experienced attorney draw up the arbitration agreement. It should clearly state that all employment disputes will be handled by arbitration. Your role in HR is to take all necessary steps to ensure employees understand that agreeing to arbitration is a condition of employment.

American workers can access the Internet, email, instant messaging and other forms of electronic communications from anywhere at anytime. While electronic communication helps people do their jobs, it also leaves a trail. A telephone conversation relies on the memory of two participants, but email and IM discussions can be preserved for years to come. And, given the casual way so many people fire off email these days, that can spell legal trouble for employers.

In recent years, it’s become clear that companies are slow to adopt flexible workplace practices. Employees at award-winning workplaces continue to lament their lack of flexibility. While 80% of Americans say they want workplace flexibility, only a third report having it. There are big barriers to adopting and sustaining flexible workplace practices within an organization. We need to shift our focus from the “why” to the “how.”

Many employees who might otherwise have considered retiring have decided to keep working for the foreseeable future. These employees may feel threatened if they are passed over for promotions. By itself, that probably isn’t enough to make them contemplate a lawsuit. But add a supervisor’s ill-timed suggestion that the employee should retire, and you may end up facing an age discrimination lawsuit.
If your employee handbook has been gathering dust, now’s the time to update it. Start by doing a quick audit. Spend a half-hour today ensuring your handbook meets these six criteria.
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