Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

Q. I am a manager for a local bank. I strongly suspect that one of my tellers is stealing because his drawer is short every week. I have interviewed several employees, but no one knows anything, and the teller refuses to answer any questions regarding the missing money. Can I require him to take a polygraph test?

Make your résumé more cutting-edge with these tips for 2010: Example: Don't put an objective statement at the top of your résumé. “Ditch it immediately,” advises Jack Williams, vice president of national sales and recruiting for Staffing Technologies. Employers don’t care what a potential hire wants to do. “They care whether they can do what the employer needs them to do,” he says. Other tips:

It’s time to take a fresh look at the health questionnaires you hand out to employees as part of your wellness program. New federal regulations that prohibit discrimination against people with congenital medical conditions mean employers and health benefits providers must immediately review health risk assessments (HRAs) to make sure they don’t ask employees to reveal protected information.

Sometimes it seems like supervisors and employees work in entirely different places. Several recent studies show that bosses and front-line employees have widely varying views about their organization’s priorities, morale, compensation and benefits. Here are seven key flashpoints:

The end of the year came and went without formal approval of the “Tax Extenders Act of 2009.” But once enacted, the new law would retroactively extend a bunch of key tax provisions that expired after 2009. Generally, it will preserve these tax benefits for one more year. Here are the main tax winners for individuals and businesses:

The cost cutting and staff reductions may not be completely over, but as the economy begins its recovery, HR will be dealing with new challenges in 2010. Here are 10 trends to expect in the coming year, plus tips and tools to help you respond to each.

Now’s a good time to double-check your wage-and-hour compliance. The DOL's Wage and Hour Division (WHD) last month completed its promised hiring of 250 new wage-and-hour investigators—a 33% increase in its investigative force. Plus, starting in early 2010, the WHD will be teaching your workers how to sue.

The cost cutting and staff reductions may not be completely over, but as the economy begins its recovery, HR will be dealing with new challenges in 2010. Still, the flush workplace of 2006 isn’t likely to rush back into vogue. In fact, the historic recession has made a lasting impression on many organizations, which could hang onto the lessons they learned while surviving lean times. Here are 10 trends to expect in the coming year, plus tips and tools to help you respond to each:

Certain employers are required to track and report their employees’ injuries and illnesses during the year, but OSHA believes it isn’t seeing the real picture. So the agency has begun a national enforcement effort to identify underrecorded and incorrectly recorded workplace injuries.

A New York City broker of apartment rentals and sales may face legal liability for alleged age bias—not because it discriminated, but because its independent contractor did. It’s a cautionary tale for any organization that outsources hiring.