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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

Test your knowledge of recent trends in employment law, comp & benefits and other HR issues with our monthly mini-quiz ...

If you have children in college, hiring them straight out of college into the family business could be a big mistake, even if they’re fabulous contributors and even though the economy stinks, says entrepreneur Allen Fishman.

Managers and employees have opposing views of privacy when it comes to employees’ off-duty postings on social networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook. In a recent Deloitte survey, 60% of executives said they have a right to know how employees portray their companies online, but 53% of workers said their off-duty posts are none of their employers’ business.

Employees who typically moonlight as sales clerks and warehouse workers to pick up extra cash for the holidays could have an especially hard time this season because so few retailers are hiring holiday help. Tip: Don’t turn away a good candidate for being overqualified for a seasonal job.

The ADEA makes it illegal to discriminate against people age 40 and older in hiring, terminations, pay, promotions, benefits and any other terms of employment. Here are the key areas where age bias claims typically pop up:

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) changed its regulations for drug testing to include direct observation of return-to-duty and follow-up drug tests. DOT regulations require random drug testing of urine for commercial motor-vehicle drivers, and pipeline, airline, transit and marine employees.

The EEOC recently filed a lawsuit against a San Antonio apartment management company for discriminating against an employee after he hired a black worker.

Employees who take their full 12 weeks of FMLA leave and can’t return to work lose their FMLA job protection. But that doesn’t mean they’re not still protected by the ADA. In fact, if an employee who can’t yet return to work asks for a reasonable accommodation—such as additional time off or a reduced schedule until she is ready for full-time work—you should consider the request.

Courts traditionally have been lenient with plaintiffs who represent themselves, giving them every benefit of the doubt. As this case shows, that seems to be changing.

A recent Illinois case illustrates how employers can get into expensive litigation if their drug-testing vendors don’t follow proper procedures when conducting random drug tests.