Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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The U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decisions in Faragher v. City of Boca Raton and Ellerth v. Burlington Industries were a wake-up call for employers to prevent, detect and remedy unlawful workplace harassment. HR's key tool for doing so: the internal investigation. When harassment rears its ugly head, here's how to conduct your investigation.

The risk isn’t new—e-mail has been around for a while. But managers and supervisors still continue to play fast and loose with their e-comments. E-mail messages are increasingly finding their way into employment-law court battles. Remind managers in the hiring process that it’s typically better to pick up the phone or walk down the hall to discuss a candidate than it is to send an e-mail.

The recession taught many employers to save on training by experimenting with video, teleconference and online learning—cost-effective alternatives to traditional stand-up courses. Follow these 10 steps to develop your organization's training. Tip: Invest in your own online learning with the HR Specialist LEAP Symposium interactive webcast.
Paid time off (PTO) plans have shot up in popularity in recent years and now are nearly the majority type of employee leave program at U.S. organizations. Use the following data from the recent Paid Time Off Programs and Practices survey by WorldatWork to benchmark your organization’s PTO practices.
Rising health care costs, implementing the new health care reforms, rapidly changing business and labor markets, growing regulatory complexity and managing the aging workforce top the list of challenges HR pros face. That's what the Society for Human Resource Management found when it surveyed more than 9,000 practitioners.
The EEOC made headlines recently when it filed suit against Kaplan Higher Learning, accusing it of discriminating against black applicants through the way it checks candidates’ credit histories. A handful of states, including Illinois and Washington, ban or severely limit use of credit checks in hiring.
Training budgets are back. Many organizations that made double-digit cuts in training funding in 2008 and 2009 increased spending on employee development last year. If your organization is ready to reinvest in training, follow these 10 principles:

Many employers have lost failure-to-hire cases alleging age discrimination because a manager involved in the hiring process mentioned age at some point during the process. The comment need not even be made to the job applicant’s face. Anything age-related said to a co-worker is fair game in court, too.

North Carolina has stringent rules to ensure that employers test their employees for drug use in an accurate and reliable way. The law requires retaining enough of the blood or urine sample so a second test can be conducted if necessary. However, the law doesn’t require employers to tell employees about their retesting rights.

Effective Jan. 1, Illinois employers must comply with the Illinois Employee Credit Privacy Act, which severely restricts the use of an applicant or employee’s credit history in hiring, firing or promotions. Covered employers may not use credit reports or credit information from sources other than credit reporting agencies when evaluating employees or applicants.
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