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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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Supervisors don’t have crystal balls that help them tell the future or read employees’ minds. Unless an em­­ployee expresses an interest in being promoted, they don’t have to consider him for open positions.
The Nishimoto Trading Co., which sells Asian foods to various Depart­­ment of Defense facilities, has agreed to pay $400,000 in back wages to women who alleged the company illegally refused to hire them. Nishi­moto operates a facility in Chicago.

Verizon employs nearly 12,000 veterans, and it also has a program to put the spouses of active-duty military members to work. It helps military spouses find Verizon jobs at locations near where their husbands or wives are assigned. The firm hires more than 500 veterans a year.

Employers may be surprised to learn there is a growing movement to add the unemployed to the list of people who belong to a protected class. If leaders in the U.S. Senate and the EEOC have their way, it may no longer be legal for em­­ployers to show a preference to hire only those who are currently employed.
Online interviews are an increasingly popular option for employers, as video technology has become simpler and cheaper—essentially free with services like Skype. Follow these tips to successfully conduct video interviews while avoiding potential pitfalls:

“Creative writing” on résumés has risen along with the unemployment rate. Sometimes, it’s outright deception. In other cases, applicants take the odd­­ball route in a bid to stand out. Some real-life ex­­am­­ples:

If your organization is typical, it’s relying more heavily on internal promotions. And as more employees compete for coveted promotion, we’re seeing a corresponding rise in failure-to-promote lawsuits. To ensure a discrimination-proof selection process, you should:

Businesses must stay abreast of an alphabet soup of federal laws—ADA, ADEA, FMLA and so forth—each with its own requirements. Further complicating matters, most states have their own laws that override the federal requirements. To comply, you first must know which laws apply to your business, based on the number of people you employ ...

What happens when applicants turn the tables on you during interviews? Are you (or the supervisors in your workplace) prepared? Here are 13 applicant questions to be prepared to answer:
Employers sometimes have several similar jobs that require almost identical skills, certificates or training. But that doesn’t mean that all these positions can’t have different hiring requirements. Just make sure you can justify the differences.
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