Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

Page 23 of 241« First...1020...222324...304050...Last »
Can you predict how a potential job candidate will behave as an em­­ployee by the color of his or her clothes? CareerBuilder recently surveyed employers to get their opinions on what they see in the tones of the threads.
According to CareerBuilder.com’s 2014 U.S. Job Forecast, hiring managers plan to recruit full-time, permanent employees for these positions: sales (30%), information technology (29%), customer service (25%), production (24%) ...
Employers are more likely to add permanent staff this year than to reduce staffing. But more than half plan to stand pat.
“Do you have any health problems?” That was one question a Con­­nec­­ti­­cut grocery store asked on its job applications. Such questions are disability-related and violate the Americans with Dis­­abilities Act.
Everyone who comes in contact with prospective job candidates, from receptionists to hiring managers, must think of themselves as salespeople at times. Here are tips to help achieve that goal.
Take this quiz to see how your hiring skills measure up when it comes to handling pre- and post-interview problems associated with résumés and references.

HR Law 101: An employer needn't hire a disabled person if he or she lacks the requisite skills, experience and education for the job in question. But if the deciding factor is the disability, you must prove that the condition interferes with what the ADA terms the "essential functions" of the job ...

Q. We make offers to applicants contingent on passing a physical examination. As a part of the examination the doctor asks for a medical history, including questions about the applicant’s family medical history. We have heard that we should not ask about the applicant’s family medical history, but we aren’t sure if that’s true. Should we not ask for this information?
Q. We pride ourselves on supporting veterans who have served in the armed forces. We know we should generally not use an applicant’s class (such as gender, race, etc.) when making hiring decisions. But we have heard that the law does allow us to give a hiring preference to veterans. Is that true?
When several qualified candidates are in the running for a job, you can use interview performance as the deciding factor. Just make sure interviewers note their specific reasons why one applicant seemed better than the others.