Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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Here are a few precepts, drawn loosely from the Lewis and Clark expedition, of maintaining a realistic optimism while leading your team into the unknown:
Nobody talks about it, and it’s against the rules of virtually every employer, yet the practice thrives: It’s called making “homers”: items or work produced on company time for personal use. Harvard Business School assistant professor Michel Anteby has explored the practice by interviewing retired French metalworkers. He found that leaders of all stripes—managers, supervisors, executives—know about homer-making, and most ignore it. But why?
Traditionally, call centers have been too pricey for small businesses that need only a few employees (or temps) to handle sales and customer-service calls. But now, more call centers are hiring home-based phone agents, making the service more affordable for small and midsize businesses.
When Thomas Neff and James Citrin were interviewing 50 CEOs and company presidents for their book Lessons From the Top, they decided they would ask all of them to name the greatest leadership lesson they had learned from reading the books by Peter F. Drucker. Here are five lessons that topped the list:
World War II news correspondent Ernie Pyle showed an extraordinary ability to write about the average GI’s thoughts, feelings and experiences.
If the people at your new job are ridiculously happy to see you, beware. You’ve just inherited a big mess. As early as the interview stage, you may see warnings. Look for problems like these:
You probably think you know your “people people.” They’re the nurturers, the team players, the diplomats. In truth, that ain’t the half of it. Researchers studied the psychological tests of more than 7,000 professionals and identified four aspects of “relational” work: influence, interpersonal facilitation, relational creativity and team leadership. Here’s what it means:
Issue: Some new job boards this year take their cues from dating sites, trying to match employers with applicants.
Benefit/risk: Such sites can eliminate unqualified applicants, but they're fishing in ...
Issue: Too often, hiring managers will poorly define to HR the type of employee they're looking to hire.
Risk: This can result in wasted time and costs, plus mounting frustration ...
Make sure your hiring managers understand that customer preference should play no part in their hiring decisions. Applicants' race, age, sex or religion ...
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