Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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If your managers completely control hiring and firing, and you’d like to explore a less hierarchical system, consider adding peer reviews. Take the U.S. Army’s Ranger school, as described by Kelly Perdew, one of only about a third of candidates who earn a Ranger tab on their first 67-day battle with the wilderness.
The way basketball player Nancy Lieberman tells it, her first visit to a tennis “workout” for Martina Navratilova went something like this: Hit a few balls, talk to a few people, hit a few lobs, go home. Lieberman could see that the tennis star lacked mental toughness and self-discipline. But with the right approach, Lieberman thought, Navratilova could become the greatest player ever.
Throughout the year, and especially during the summer, many of our enterprises use college interns to fill out our teams, handle routine tasks and help us get the job done. Here are some guidelines to keep in mind for using interns on your team.
Even though we warned you recently not to let employees take undue advantage of them, flexible work options  continue to offer small businesses a significant advantage over large businesses in recruiting and retaining employees.
In addition to the Roth IRA and kiddie-tax changes described above, here are other key provisions of the new tax law passed last month:
Ever notice a tendency to blabber about your team, yourself or your organization instead of actually interviewing a job candidate? Welcome to the most common blunder in hiring. Here’s how to recognize this syndrome and fix it:
The IRS thought its new program of hiring private debt collectors would be up and running by summer.
If you’re like most U.S. employers, you probably overpay some health care claims and provide coverage to employees or dependents who shouldn’t receive it. That’s because health insurers make more processing and payment errors than you’d expect.
Brazilian equipment supplier Semco has grown an average 27.5 percent a year for 14 years, despite wild fluctuations in Brazil’s economy. The reason: Semco’s radical use of participative management. Of the employees’ 3,000 votes, CEO Ricardo Semler gets only one.
Randy Nelson, dean of Pixar University, doesn’t like outsourcing, but not for the reasons you might think. He’s not worried about job security; his reasons are all about creativity.