Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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One way for a candidate to prove discrimination in hiring or promotion is to show that he is so much better qualified than other candidates that there should have been no doubt about who got the job. Some candidates mistakenly believe that means if they are the best educated, they win. That’s simply not true.

This summer’s hiring expectations mark a continued improvement over the years immediately following the recession, according to CareerBuilder’s annual Summer Jobs Forecast.
More than one-third of 400 HR pros surveyed annually by the Center for Professional Excellence say that professionalism among recent college grad hires has decreased in the past five years.
The NYPD has agreed to a settlement in a disability discrimination case filed by the U.S. Department of Justice. An applicant for a school crossing guard position had filed the complaint and later sued, alleging that the NYPD required a physical examination im­­mediately upon completion of a job application.
Everyone knows to steer clear of job interview questions that could trigger claims of bias. But several common kinds of questions are just as boneheaded, although not for legal reasons.

Hiring gets harder when a dozen or more applicants meet your minimum requirements. How do you pick the best candidate and reduce the chance of unhappy job-seekers filing discrimination lawsuits? The best approach is an organized one.

Staffing agencies conduct lots of drug tests—and hear lots of excuses when applicants fail. Scott Morefield, of AtWork Personnel Services, recounts these:
The Minnesota Senate has approved a measure that would prohibit most private employers from asking job applicants about past criminal convictions until they have been interviewed or made a conditional job offer.
Here’s a simple tip that can save you lots of headaches: Docu­­ment the exact date an applicant submits her paperwork and the date of each decision related to her application.
A new study by the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern found that once candi­dates make it to the interview level, the most common mechanism by which they are evaluated is their similarity to the interviewer.
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