FMLA Guidelines

We’ll assist you in tracking and managing intermittent FMLA leave … fighting FMLA fraud and FMLA abuse … and managing FMLA in general.

Beyond mastering FMLA regulations on intermittent leave, we’ll share FMLA guidelines on how to curb FMLA abuse, and dramatically improve your overall FMLA compliance.

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Do you automatically terminate employees who aren’t ready to return to work after using up their FMLA leave? That may be okay under the FMLA.
Employees who claim they were fired for taking FMLA leave must show that taking leave was the sole reason they were fired—what’s known as the “but-for” cause.
Don’t be afraid to ask employees for documentation showing that they qualify for FMLA leave. Unless you are actively harassing the worker about taking leave, asking for certification or more information doesn’t interfere with his FMLA rights.
You don’t have to be sued to lose an FMLA case.
It may seem crazy that your employees can use their allotted job-protected FMLA leave time to work on a second job. But, as long as they have a legitimate reason for the leave, they can use their leave any way they please.
A federal court has issued an injunction preventing an employer from firing a worker seeking to take FMLA leave until the litigation ends. That could take years.
It can take a long time to process an FMLA request, especially if the employee doesn’t promptly respond to demands to provide medical certification of the need for leave.

No-fault attendance programs were designed to be completely objective, the idea being that all absences and therefore all workers are treated equally. But the FMLA and ADA require employers to know why an employee was absent, so the “hear no evil” approach can't work.

Some employees seem to think that if they are approved for FMLA leave, their employers have to accept their time off as legitimate. That’s true to a point. But it doesn’t mean employers can’t ferret out leave abuse if they have reason to believe the employee isn’t being honest.
When an employee returns from FMLA leave and his employer assigns him to light-duty work, that is basically an acknowledgment that the employee has a serious health condition incapacitating enough to interfere with performing an essential job function. The employer can’t later challenge that part of FMLA eligibility.
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