FMLA Guidelines

We’ll assist you in tracking and managing intermittent FMLA leave … fighting FMLA fraud and FMLA abuse … and managing FMLA in general.

Beyond mastering FMLA regulations on intermittent leave, we’ll share FMLA guidelines on how to curb FMLA abuse, and dramatically improve your overall FMLA compliance.

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When an employee works in a demanding position and has a medical crisis, he may not be able to return quickly to his old job. It’s en­­tirely possible he may use all available FMLA leave and other accrued leave and still receive clearance to work. That doesn’t mean his employer isn’t obligated to try to reasonably accommodate him.
It's time to replace that FMLA poster in your break room. By March 8, 2013, employers covered under the FMLA (those with 50 or more employees) must display the new version of the Employee Rights and Responsibilities under the FMLA poster. This most recent version includes new changes relating to military family leave and FMLA leave for airline flight crews. You don’t need to spend a penny to comply; you can download a free copy of the official poster here ...
Taking FMLA leave doesn’t protect employees from being fired for other reasons.
It has always been understood that employees are entitled to take FMLA leave to care for minor children with serious health conditions. But it’s been less clear how the FMLA applies to employees who need time off to care for an adult son or daughter. Now the U.S. Department of Labor has weighed in with guidance.
A refusal to grant time off as an accommodation for the disability of an employee’s family member will only pass muster for employers too small to be covered by the FMLA or employees who did not work long enough to be eligible for FMLA leave.

Track every employee’s use of FMLA leave and what happens when he returns to work. Why? If you happen to terminate the employee shortly after he returns from approved FMLA leave, he may claim retaliation.

Twenty years ago today, President Bill Clinton signed the FMLA into law. Since 1993, the law has provided eligible employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year for the birth, adoption or foster care of a child; caring for a child, spouse or parent with a serious health condition; or convalescence after an employee’s own serious health condition. Here's a primer on one of the nation's most critical employment laws

Making comments about someone’s illness is both rude and unprofessional. It may also be the basis for a lawsuit. That’s reason enough to warn supervisors and managers against discussing medical problems related to FMLA leave

Q. Our office received medical information from an employee’s physician in conjunction with his FMLA leave request. What’s the best way for us to maintain this kind of documentation?
Q. One of our employees has asked to go on medical leave due to “stress.” Does stress qualify as a condition that requires leave?
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