Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

Every year, employers face yet another increase in their health insurance premiums. And if there are many older or sick employees, those costs will keep on rising. Even adding one sick child to the list can drive costs into the stratosphere. But before you even consider firing (or refusing to hire) someone because they might jack up insurance costs, count your dollars, not your pennies. You might be staring down a lawsuit that could dwarf whatever premium costs you hoped to avoid.

Before terminating an employee who has recently filed a discrimination claim, consider whether the timing may provoke a retaliation lawsuit. Generally, the closer in time to the complaint a termination occurs, the more likely a court will order a jury trial. You may still terminate the employee—if you’re sure that’s appropriate.

Tim Murnane left real estate development firm Opus Northwest in June 2009 after negotiating a $2 million severance package to be paid out over 10 years. Murnane took a new position with St. Louis-based Clayco Inc., another developer in the Twin Cities area. All was going well until March, when a scheduled $79,266 payment from Opus failed to arrive in Murnane’s mailbox ...

Employees may be disabled under the ADA if surgery or another medical condition forces them to use the bathroom frequently. The condition affects a major life activity—elimination of wastes.
It’s hand-to-hand combat between video gaming giant Activision Publishing and two former executives of its Infinity Ward software development studio subsidiary. At stake in the courtroom war: Tens of millions of dollars in damages and untold millions in profits from Activision’s lucrative “Call of Duty” war gaming franchise.

The little things employees do while they’re getting ready for work—putting on safety gear, firing up their computers, standing in line to get equipment—can sometimes be considered paid work time. Courts often see such “preparatory work” as compensable, even if it benefits the employee, too. Consider this recent case involving making the morning coffee and breakfast before the start of a shift.

Employment practice liability insurance (EPLI) covers you from employee lawsuit judgments. The jump in employee lawsuits is making EPLI a nearly must-have; so premiums are rising. Here's how to shop for a policy ...
Lots of employers have no-fault attendance policies, which allow a certain number of unexcused absences without any documentation, and then punish employees who go beyond allowable limits. No-fault policies are fine—as long as they don’t penalize workers for taking FMLA time off.
You have heard all the general advice and theories about getting “a seat at the table.” But what does it take to jump the fence from your administrative role and be seen as a true leader in the company? The HR Specialist newsletter posed the following question to three of the leading HR thought leaders in America today: “What makes an HR professional an indispensable leader in an organization?” Their answers pointed to the following 5 actions:
If you decide not to hire an applicant based on a background check, the applicant has a right to see the information the reporting agency provided. But what about complaints from customers or clients that become the basis for termination? Do those complaints have to be disclosed to the fired employee? Not according to a recent 5th Circuit Court of Appeals decision.