Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

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Almost every employer understands that they can’t discriminate against employees on the basis of race. But race discrimination protections also apply even when employers contract out their work. Contractors who believe they have suffered bias can sue under the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

In tough economic times, people who lose their jobs often have to file for bankruptcy. But some employers frown on bankruptcy and don’t want to hire someone who can’t pay his or her bills. Now the 5th Circuit Court of Ap­­­­peals has ruled that a private employer is free to turn down an applicant because he or she filed for bankruptcy.

Michael DeMarquis worked for the Bexar County Office of the Constable for only five months, but between August and December 2009, he says he compiled an extensive list of illegal practices. Now he’s suing the law enforcement agency, claiming he was fired from his job as a warrant clerk in retaliation after he uncovered the following:

If you sometimes agonize over firing an employee for fear of litigation, relax. As long as you act honestly, the employee probably can’t successfully sue.
Most employees can’t be fired for their legal, off-duty activities. But that’s not true for some government employees. For example, police officers, judges and teachers have a higher duty to the citizens they serve, and they can be terminated for off-duty conduct.

The health care reform law requires you to report the value of employees’ health benefits on their W-2 forms. The IRS waived mandatory reporting for 2011, pending future guidance. Now the guidance has been released. It requires employers filing 250 or more W-2s to report beginning with 2012 W-2s that are filed in 2013.

Hourly employees know that if they work overtime, their employer must pay them for the extra hours. That’s true, but it doesn’t mean they can work OT whenever they feel like it. Here’s how to end unauthorized overtime:
Here’s some help for HR professionals trying to do all they can to safeguard their organization’s exempt/nonexempt employee classifications—especially in an economic climate that requires companies to do more with less:

Even if your employees don’t belong to a union, the National Labor Relations Act applies to you. For example, the National Labor Relations Board recently announced that a nonunionized employer will pay $900,000 to two fired employees to settle charges that it violated the NLRA. Here's a compliance primer.

Q. Our mailroom supervisor is currently classified as exempt because his position includes qualifications such as hiring and firing the mailroom staff. But for the most part, he mainly performs mailroom duties. Have we classified him correctly?
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