Firing — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 52
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

Page 52 of 233« First...102030...515253...607080...Last »
It may sound silly, but there’s a very practical reason to be careful when questioning employees during an investigation: Some especially sensitive people may feel they are being held involuntarily—and sue for false imprisonment.
A recent state appellate court decision offers clarification about how employers can handle an employee’s false or exaggerated sexual harassment complaints.
Don’t agonize over terminating an employee for misconduct. You can be wrong about the underlying facts as long as you acted in good faith when making the firing decision.
Don’t agonize over terminating an employee for misconduct. You can be wrong about the underlying facts as long as you acted in good faith when making the firing decision.
Don’t agonize over terminating an employee for misconduct. You can be wrong about the underlying facts as long as you acted in good faith when making the firing decision.
Employees who commit “aggravated misconduct” and are terminated may not be eligible for unemployment compensation benefits. Therefore, some employers may assume that when an employee is arrested and charged with a felony related to work, it makes sense to fire the employee. Not necessarily.
When training managers and supervisors on how to treat subordinates, make sure they understand they should never make any belligerent statements that could be interpreted as defamation or slander.
OSHA has ordered Orlando-based AirTran to pay $1 million in damages after it found the airline retaliated against a pilot reporting safety problems.
The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has made it clear that it isn’t interested in interfering unnecessarily with management decisions ... The lesson here is that as long as you have a rational reason for discharging an employee, chances are your decision won’t be questioned.
The 11th Circuit has ruled for the first time on an important FMLA question, providing greater protection for employees who are not yet eligible for FMLA leave but who request leave that will start once they become eligible.
Page 52 of 233« First...102030...515253...607080...Last »