Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

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Government employees don’t lose the right to engage in free speech when they take a job. That extends to speech that the employer may see as unpopular or even dangerous.
Smart employers catalog every instance of discipline. Those records come in handy if you must fire one employee for breaking the same rule as another employee who wasn’t terminated.
Often before an employer implements a reduction in force, it may try to encourage employees to resign or retire by offering early-out incentives.

You can terminate a disabled individual if you conclude the employee can’t under perform the essential functions of a job with or without accommodations.

Before firing anyone, ask yourself the following questions to gauge whether you could defend yourself in a wrongful discharge suit.
Employees who elect to continue their health insurance coverage after a work separation get to maintain that coverage even if the employer switches plans.
If an employee alleges she lost her job during a reduction in force because of discrimination or retaliation, counter that claim by showing there were real economic reasons for letting her go.
Employers have the right to contest a former employee’s eligibility for unemployment benefits. Talk it over with your attorney first.
Workers don’t give up their First Amendment rights when they take a government job. But that doesn’t mean that they can say anything, anywhere.
It should be item No. 1 on the termination checklist.
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